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December 22, 2004

New resources from The Sentencing Project

I just noticed that The Sentencing Project, a non-profit organization which does terrific research and advocacy work on a range of criminal justice issues, has on its website new resources on Blakely and on the scope of imprisonment.

On a page appropriately titled "Awaiting the Supreme Court," Executive Director Malcolm Young provides extensive background on Blakely and the pending Booker and Fanfan.  This discussion of the cases also effectively integrates (and links to) other important recent sentencing reform developments.

And a document entitled "New Prison Figures: Rising Population Despite Falling Crime Rates" provides an effective and compelling summary of the latest prison data released by the Bureau of Justice Statistics last month (discussed here).  The document also discusses nationwide sentencing developments and has an amazing final graph of different countries' incarcertaion rates (which shows that the US rate of incarceration is more than 5 times China's, more than 10 times Japan's and more than 20 times India's rate of incarceration).

December 22, 2004 at 06:30 PM | Permalink

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Comments

"Rising [Prison] Population Despite Falling Crime Rates" sounds like a headline from the Onion.

Posted by: Stan (law student) | Dec 22, 2004 6:46:43 PM

A challenge for all you legal types. It came up in a conversation with one of the federal appellate lawyers in the form of a comment...
he basically said:
"...the core problem is total confusion about what thejuvenile justice system is supposed to be...is it rehabilitation or just a system that "marks" folk for special treatment when they get to adult court?..."
What is it? animal or mineral?
I know it has a tremendous, often disastrous, effect on the sentencing guidelines.
Any discussion, oh legal scholars?
thank you!
mary (mother of a prisoner of the drug war)

Posted by: mary | Dec 23, 2004 10:57:47 AM

well, here's the deal. One reason the population also keeps growing is that Congress has repeatedly and drastically cut the federal court's budget. That doesn't just mean the judges and their staff. It also affects the probation office which is left with the task of getting those addicted to drug counsleing with no money. To top it off, a long time frustration for those probation officers is there is never any money for REAl drug treatment,.i.e. if a person relapses and can't get clean, the only recourse is to revoke them. Afew years ago Congress even changed it so that after 2 positives, the person has to be revoked. Despite the fact that probation officers go begging to keep them in the comunity to work with them. There is no detox/inpatient treatment money. Barely enough for outpatient counsleing. Mental Health?...forget about it!
As for juveniles. There are no real options in the federal system and thus, they are usually prosecuted in state court

Posted by: Sharon Valenti | Dec 23, 2004 3:08:39 PM

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