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August 11, 2005

WorldCom sentencing wrap-up and reflections

Ellen Podgor in this post over at the White Collar Crime Prof Blog has a terrific summary and analysis of the federal sentences handed out to the various defendants in the WorldCom fraud case.  Ellen focuses on the profound impact that cooperating with the government has had on these sentencings (and this a trend which should continue with today's scheduled sentencing of key cooperator Scott Sullivan).  And Tom Kirkendall over at the blog Houston's Clear Thinkers shares a number of additional observations on these cooperation realities in this post.

UPDATE: As detailed in this AP report, Scott Sullivan "was sentenced to five years in prison Thursday by a judge who called him 'the architect' of the largest accounting fraud in U.S. history."  Peter Henning at White Collar Crime Prof Blog provides commentary on this outcome hereThis NY Times account of the sentence astutely notes that 5 years for Sullivan is "a fifth of what sentencing guidelines suggested and a striking example of the benefits of cooperating with government prosecutors."

August 11, 2005 at 09:47 AM | Permalink

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» WorldCom Flipper Gets 5 Years from TalkLeft: The Politics of Crime
Scott Sullivan, the architect of the accounting fraud scheme that toppled WorldCom, was sentenced today to five years in prison. He could have gotten 25 years, but he was rewarded for his cooperation in the case against former WorldCom CEO... [Read More]

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