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November 15, 2006

Death, American federalism style

250pxlove_american_stylePerhaps it is a sign of too much time at the computer that two death penalty items somehow got me to thinking about a campy TV show from the early 1970s.  Whatever the reason for my Dennis Miller moment, these two vignettes about recent death penalty developments provide interesting insights into the dynamic federalism aspects of America's system of capital punishment:

  • How Appealing details here that Texas Court of Criminal Appeals has now ruled that President Bush was powerless to force the Texas judiciary to disregard its rules of procedural default to consider a Mexican death row inmate's Vienna Convention claim.
  • The Death Penalty Information Center details here that federal District Court Judge Jeremy Fogel is expected to rule soon on the challenge to the lethal injection process in California, a case which has produced an extended de facto moratorium in the state with the largest death row in the country.

UPDATE: Lyle Denniston has a lot more on the Texas decision here at SCOTUSblog.

November 15, 2006 at 01:21 PM | Permalink

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Comments

Medellin committed an awful crime. He deserves to die.

Posted by: sobrien | Nov 15, 2006 8:48:22 PM

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