« Another year for giving thanks | Main | Around the blogosphere »

November 22, 2006

So many sex offender stories

The interesting sex offender stories never seem to slow down.  First, as covered well by Sex Crimes and How Appealing, New York's highest court has held that sex offenders could not be sent to mental institutions after release from prison under a New York rule.  Second, the Washington Post has this front-page story, entitled "Some Curbs on Sex Offenders Called Ineffective, Inhumane," about sex offender residency restrictions.  Here is how it starts:

As convicted sex offenders go, they seem to pose little danger.  One is 100 years old.  Another can barely walk and is in the late stages of Alzheimer's disease. Another is dying of heart disease in a nursing home. Yet, under a new Georgia law, thousands of registered sex offenders, even the old and feeble, could be pushed from their homes and hospices.

"He doesn't really know anything about it," said Ruby Anderson, 77, whose husband was convicted of having sex with a minor in 1997 and, at 81, no longer recognizes members of his family because of Alzheimer's disease. "The trouble is, I just don't know where we can go."

As states around the country have sought in recent years to control the whereabouts of convicted sex offenders, Georgia's law stands out as one of the toughest, a testament to the daunting public fears regarding children's safety.  The roughly 10,000 sex offenders living in Georgia have been forbidden to live within 1,000 feet of a school, playground, church or school bus stop.  Taken together, the prohibitions place nearly all the homes in some counties off-limits -- amounting, in a practical sense, to banishment.

"My intent personally is to make it so onerous on those that are convicted of these offenses . . . they will want to move to another state," Georgia House Majority Leader Jerry Keen (R), who sponsored the bill, told reporters.  Since the law's enactment in July, however, a federal judge, human rights advocates and even some of the sheriff's departments that are supposed to enforce the measure have suggested that the zeal for safety may have gone too far. The residency law applies not only to sexual predators but to all people registered for sexual crimes, including men and women convicted of having underage consensual sex while in high school.

Advocates for the sex offenders say the law is unfair to people who have served their sentences and been deemed rehabilitated.  Many police officers, prosecutors and children's advocates also question whether such measures are effective.  Most predators are mobile, after all, and by upending their lives, the law may make them more likely to commit other offenses, critics say.

November 22, 2006 at 10:44 AM | Permalink

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451574769e200d834fdaee169e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference So many sex offender stories:

Comments

I am concerned with churches who allow sex offenders in, when the leadership, allows them in by secret, not informing their members. Then the leadership founds out that the sex offender is on the run, a fugitive, and does not do anything about reporting him.
Being a child abuse advocate, I am concerned with how church leadership should do the right procedures to protect the children in the church.
Church members should be notified when a sex offender in present in their churches, pre meeting and discussion on how to handle this situation, with respect to all members, and the sex offender who is now back into the community after sentencing.
I concerned me that churches are allowing sex offenders in, when they are fugitives. I know of a church that allowed this, did the pastor think that he could keep this a secret, when this sex offender was arrested for doing more sexual assaults on children? It was in the local newspaper that this sex offender was arrested, now the pastor is denying some involvement in what he did, allowing the sex offender in his church, fully knowing that this offender was on the run.
Lela

Posted by: Lela | Nov 22, 2006 11:10:29 AM

Most predators are mobile, after all, and by upending their lives, the law may make them more likely to commit other offenses, critics say.

I'm not sure that I follow the logic here.

Posted by: | Nov 22, 2006 1:17:51 PM

I think the logic is that people with stable lives (a place to live, a job, a family) are less likely to commit crimes. A law that effectively makes them homeless is therefore likely to have a destablilizing effect. I can't say whether this is true, but the logic is clear enough.

Posted by: Marc Shepherd | Nov 22, 2006 3:29:11 PM

I am a criminal defense attorney who has represented a number of "sex offenders" in NY. My problem with the entire registration concept is that it is solely reserved for sex offenders, including first time offenders. I personally would much prefer to know that my neighbor has been convicted of multiple burglaries, or even homicide, but these are not what the politicians care about. The decision of the NY Court of Appeals was truly heartening.

Posted by: Bernie Kleinman | Nov 22, 2006 4:10:19 PM

I am the wife of a one time too many sex offender who of course, is registered.
My concern is how this publicity (registry) affects the victim of incest and the other siblings in the home. I could mention the wife as well as the extended family, but for now my main concern is our children.
While the local comnmunity police knew of my husband's record, my husband faced a healthy threat not to re-abuse anyone and to date 20+ years later is still considered a one time offender. I must add he followed court ordered counseling, but from a bird's-eye view noted healing once he accepted Christ as his personal Savior. That is when a new creature through Christ was noted. Christ and his family have forgiven him.
My concern now is how the public registry affects the families of the offenders. Our nightmare began when the registry became public.
The victim herself is scrutinized by neighbors as she raises her three babies being labeled "coming from a dysfunctional family" and is likely to sexually offend since she was a victim. In their ignorance, they don't know all the facts. One being, she received counseling from a professional child psychologist not only after the molestation but taken by her mom to continued counseling at any point in her life for any concerns, ie. grades, relationships, dating, or any possible re-offense, etc. Her father also had this at his disposal at anytime in his life.
Her own in-laws turned against her upon their knowledge of his registration. They continually threaten her about her parental rights in raising her children.
Once my son's fiancee' discovered his father was a registered sex offender, she broke up with him. They had consensual sex she being 23 & him 25 , and was pregnant. He wanted his parental rights including financial responsibility. After pursueing a lawyer for DNA tests and parental responsibility, she filed false "rape charges". A few thousand dollars later from my son's pocket, she dropped the charges with it not costing her a dime. Financially exhausted to date, he still has no parental rights.
The younger two adult daughters are single, pursueing their education prior to marriage, however, express concern as to how public knowledge of a family members record can and may eventually affect their lives in such negative ways.
My question is:
"Just where does the family members rights to privacy begin? or should I say even exist?, and where does the publics "right to know" begin?, end? but obviously exist!!!!

Posted by: Debra Smith | Jan 29, 2007 4:42:35 PM

I am an ex-wife to a convicted sex offender in PA. He molested girls and was charged while we were married and I had just had our children. Since then I have been fighting custody for 3 years. I have been asking for supervised visitation and sole legal custody.Our last order in February was our final order giving him every other weekend and 4 hrs every other week out of state, plus shared legal custody. My case is headed to superior court. I have very low funds and have been desperate to protecting our children as well as other's. Since he is now off parole and has this order he has every right to be around other children because of ours. I am looking for help and looking for legislature to make stronger laws regarding sex offenders and parental rights.

Posted by: Jules Bellock | Apr 1, 2008 12:53:18 AM

I am an ex-wife to a convicted sex offender in PA. He molested girls and was charged while we were married and I had just had our children. Since then I have been fighting custody for 3 years. I have been asking for supervised visitation and sole legal custody.Our last order in February was our final order giving him every other weekend and 4 hrs every other week out of state, plus shared legal custody. My case is headed to superior court. I have very low funds and have been desperate to protecting our children as well as other's. Since he is now off parole and has this order he has every right to be around other children because of ours. I am looking for help and looking for legislature to make stronger laws regarding sex offenders and parental rights.

Posted by: Jules Bellock | Apr 1, 2008 12:54:46 AM

The biological father of my child is a sex offender. Despite 13 counts against him and many more that he was not charged with he was allowed to plea-out to only 3 of them. After a little over 6 years in prison he will be released. Yes he will have to "register" as a sex offender for life but because of his plea bargain and the offenses he pled down to he will not be considered a predatory offender. There will be no notification to neighbors, local schools, etc. Keep in mind that while he is labeled a 1x sex offender he has a history of abuse dating back to his child-hood. He was an on-line predator as well. Young Teen-age girls were his favorite victims.

Posted by: Anon | Apr 17, 2008 5:03:49 PM

The son of my wife's best friend was convicted as a sex offender at age of 18. His crime was that he slapped a young woman on the rear at a party where everyone was drinking alcohol. He did not intentionally try to sexually batter this woman. He simply was just intoxicated and did not realize how serious his act could turn out. We all feel that the court prosecutor railroaded him into pleading guilty to that crime since he was not totally aware of the consequences that would bring. His public defender definitely failed to protect his rights. He is now over 30 years old, and is constantly hounded by law enforcement officials when they discover his conviction as a sex offender. He currently suffers from heart disease and related ailments and, and was recently incarcinated for failure to register as a sex offender after he was released from a halfway house. Are there any advocate groups that he can contact who can help him appeal his conviction? He cannot afford an attorney.

Posted by: John Meno | Jul 26, 2008 1:25:05 PM

I wanted to know if a father convicted of a sex crime has the right to see his biological children if the sex crime was not committed against his children? Does it matter either way?

Posted by: Cathy Lions | Sep 4, 2008 1:01:50 PM

I wanted to add that I live in PA. I know the laws are different in each state. I know several sex offenders who have visitation rights with their children. I'm guessing it is based on the exent of the crime as to whether they get supervised or unsupervised visits; is this correct?

Posted by: Cathy Lions | Sep 4, 2008 1:04:29 PM

I believe education is the solutiuon to all of this Sex offender problems. They (offenders) are every where. Your brother, Mother, Uncle, The guy next door, Basketball coach, Teacher, Father, Just to mention a few. There is to be more education in the homes and schools.

There is a good facts available to the public that the media has not share. Treatment will work for those who take it and make it there own. Check the facts, don't be run by media hipe.

Murders,and other fedral crimes have a much hire reoffend rate than sex offenders who have completed treatment and established them selves into the community. When you look at the facts, more should be done for other crimes to be held accountable after prison than sex offenders.

Think about it!! Sex offender released and turned over to DOC State. He or she must comply to stay free. The DOC will have rules that are pollygraph every min of four times a year. Check with there probation officer two times a month and UA two times a month. Register with the State for residence. Checked quartly by the probation officer on residence. Not to mention other requirments of AA, Na, Sa meetings.

So you know where they are and where they work. They work on settling into the community. The ones you should be aware of are the one that are not bing watched. What is your friend doing with your child now? Or your Basketball coach? Is the baby sitter looking out for his or her best interests? Makes you wonder, it should!


Posted by: Melvin | Sep 6, 2008 2:32:55 PM

I have a friend that has had indecency with a child, but plans to try to gain custody in the future. I was surprised to hear this and he is very ill in the head from past problems. His wife who he dearly does love is a illegal immigrant with no papers. She plans to stay married to him, is it possible for him to gain custody of the child is one of the question. Another is can he live with his wife once he has finished his sentence because he did do this to his step-child, but he also has his biological children as well with her.

Posted by: Daniel | Sep 11, 2008 8:08:50 PM

I am the wife of a sex offender. He is a 1st time offender and is on 5 years probation. His offense was with a 15 year old female. We have 3 small children and he is an excellent father. The prosecutor asked that my husband not have unsupervised contact with anyone under 18...including his own children until I (his wife) complete a partner's treatment program. The judge allowed this. My husband has not been allowed to be with our kids unsupervised (which means he can't live with us) for 6 months now. I have completed the partner's program and we are finally meeting this week to see if he can be with his biological children unsupervised and live with us. My question is...if the crime was not against his own children...wasn't even against a child close to his biological kids' ages; no one from the system has ever checked up on our kids...no home visit, phone calls, nothing; and I have completed the treatment program that was required before he could be with his kids unsupervised...can they legally deny him to live with his family still? (He has even had the psychological assessments done by a highly trusted and respected professional which reported that he is highly unlikely to reoffend.)

Posted by: Jacquie | Sep 30, 2008 11:15:15 PM

I wanted to know if a father convicted of a sex crime has the right to see his biological children if the sex crime was not committed against his children? but against his 7 year old neice

Posted by: angela | Oct 21, 2008 3:15:13 PM

debra smith that posted above please contact me I woudl love to talk with you about our similar situation autumnflwr311@hotmail.com

Posted by: Jennifer | Oct 29, 2008 11:45:15 AM

Jacquie and John,

My ex husband is a sex offender and has been able to see his daughter since day 1. His offense was against other children and his visitations have been supervised (although he wants to get that changed now that it has been 6 years). He told me while he was in prison that it DOES matter if it isn't one of their own children. It is a different kind of offender that goes after their own then goes after other people's children. I'm not sure if that's true, but that is our situation. I hope that helps. :-)

Posted by: Rebecca | Oct 29, 2008 5:11:32 PM

i am a convicted sex offender against an adult woman my lawyer told me to take the plea they told me i would beable to see my kids and not have to register.i did not rape anyone i just passed out on her lap.my po treats my case as if im a child molester can i get a lawyer to help me see my kids i have 3 kids i havnt seen in a year to this date its really hard.shouldnt there be different panalties for each crime i would hope they drop the law harder on child molesters but no they dont its all the same for everyone.i seriosly need help my kids are going through a horrible life

Posted by: rob | Oct 31, 2008 9:52:39 PM

i am a convicted sex offender against an adult woman my lawyer told me to take the plea they told me i would beable to see my kids and not have to register.i did not rape anyone i just passed out on her lap.my po treats my case as if im a child molester can i get a lawyer to help me see my kids i have 3 kids i havnt seen in a year to this date its really hard.shouldnt there be different panalties for each crime i would hope they drop the law harder on child molesters but no they dont its all the same for everyone.i seriosly need help my kids are going through a horrible life

Posted by: rob | Oct 31, 2008 9:54:06 PM

My boyfriend ans I have a daughter of 4 years and he is in probation, after 4 years incarcerated for marihuana possession. He is a sex offender since 1986 and this happened with a 16 years old girl when he was 19. Would the fact that he has a daughter may affect his parole process? Would it be better for him to let know his Probation officer about his daughter and that we want to live together again? Please, I need your opinion. Thank you.

Posted by: Viridiana Rivera | Dec 18, 2008 12:55:27 AM

In Defense of the Indefensible

“Turn on Channel 3 News, now!” my wife shouted from upstairs. She sounded serious. I switched channels just in time to see our friend, Brad, being escorted by police into the Chatham County Jail. Brad was in handcuffs. He looked confused. A news reporter was saying, “The suspect, a Pittsboro attorney, was arrested earlier today at his home for a series of Internet sex crimes.” The reporter said that our friend, Brad was charged with sending child pornographic images over the Internet. The report went on to explain that Brad was arrested as part of an interstate sting operation conducted by Florida State Police.

My wife, Carol, came downstairs looking stunned. She said, “Can you believe this? This must be some kind of mistake.” I agreed. At that moment the news report was unbelievable to me. I thought it was more plausible that the police had made a mistake and arrested the wrong person.

We had known Brad and his family for about five years. We were not close friends but certainly friendly acquaintances. Brad’s son played on a soccer team with our son and Brad had been the team manager. We traveled to many games across North Carolina and had spent a great deal of time on the sidelines with Brad and his ex-wife. On a several occasions Brad and I had killed time together in a sports bar waiting for soccer practice to end so we could pick up our sons.

I knew Brad as a conscientious and responsible parent. He attended almost every game and was very supportive of his son. My wife and I often discussed how well Brad and his ex-wife cooperated with each other. They appeared to have a better relationship than a lot of married people we knew.

The morning after the television news report we were shocked again. A newspaper account provided more detail about the charges against Brad.

“[The suspect] was arrested after soliciting who he thought was a 14-year-old boy, but in fact was an undercover Cyber Crime investigator. [The suspect], 49, approached the ‘child’ in an online chat room for young boys and chatted with him over the course of five months. During their communication, he sent numerous images of child and adult pornography to the boy. He also repeatedly stated his desire to travel to Jacksonville to engage in various sex acts with the boy, according to the arrest warrant. At the time of his arrest, [the suspect] admitted he was the person chatting with the ‘boy’ online.”

Brad’s admission that he was the person chatting was enough to crack my denial. I realized that this was not a case of mistaken identity.

A few days later I took my son to soccer practice and saw Brad’s ex-wife surrounded by several soccer moms in the parking lot. She had the look of a person grieving a death in the family. She was explaining to her friends that the allegations were probably true. She said that Brad was a “very troubled person.” She kept repeating, “I do know that Brad has not engaged in inappropriate behavior with any of our children.” The soccer moms were offering support and asking how they could help. Most of the concern was related to the impact this event was having on Brad’s son.

The soccer dads were not focusing on the emotional needs of Brad's family. They were focused on expressions of outrage. They spoke about Brad as if they had always known he was a sex offender. A week ago he had been a reasonably amiable member of the soccer dad group. His history with the group was now irrelevant. Suddenly he was a sex offender and nothing else. "Pretty sick, huh?" One guy said as I walked up. "I hope they throw away the key on him.” I was more interested in the soccer mom conversation and wandered back to join it.

I learned from Brad's ex-wife that he was likely to be held in the Chatham County Jail until he could be extradited to Florida. I asked her if she thought it would be okay if I wrote a letter to Brad. She said she thought Brad would appreciate it and directed me to the Chatham County Jail website to get the address.

The letter initiated my first (and probably only) pen pal relationship with someone incarcerated for a sex offense. The first few letters focused on circumstances in the present tense. I tried to keep Brad informed about the news of his son’s soccer team. He described to me what his life was like inside county jail. I made it clear in my letters that I was appalled by his criminal behavior. I also wrote, “Your experience has reminded me that even good people can commit very bad and illegal acts.”

Over the next few months Brad and I exchanged letters that became more interesting and revealing. He never denied nor made excuses for the behavior that lead to his arrest. He explained that he was gradually recognizing that he had “unresolved confusion” about sexuality for many years. He wrote that prior to his arrest he had been under a high level of personal stress. He described being deeply depressed and “addicted to the Internet.” He repeatedly expressed his recognition that he needed treatment.

After about a month in the Chatham County, Jail Brad was extradited to a jail in Jacksonville, Florida. Even though he had no prior criminal history, his bond was set at an amount that was impossible for him to meet. Posting the bond set by the court would have left him without with enough money for an adequate defense. So he waited in the Duval County Detention Facility for another seven months.

During those seven months Brad hoped he would receive mental health treatment or, at least, a mental health evaluation. Unfortunately, no such evaluation was available. Brad wrote that no one he knew in jail had access to mental health services.

I mentioned this circumstance to an attorney in my neighborhood who taught at the UNC School of Law. He said, “A mental health evaluation probably wouldn’t make any difference because sex offenders don’t respond to treatment.” I thought the law professor’s certainty was strange, so later I searched “sex offender treatment and recidivism” on the Internet. I read numerous articles that contradicted the law professor. One was published in 2001 by the National Center for Sex Offender Management. It said,
“Results [from a sample of 11,000 sex offenders] indicated that sex offenders who participated in relapse prevention treatment programs had a combined re-arrest rate of 7.2 percent, compared to 17.6 percent for untreated offenders. The overall re-arrest rate for treated sex offenders in this analysis was 13.2 percent.”

While waiting for seven months in Duval County Detention Facility Brad became more aware of some of the quirks in the justice system. For example, he wondered how the court determined who waited for justice inside a cell and who waited for it outside. He said he met one inmate who had physically assaulted a police officer and was released on $50,000 bond. Another man was charged with impregnating a sixteen year old relative ($150,000 bond). A male prostitute with AIDS was charged with a 3rd degree felony for having unprotected sex ($1,500 bond). Brad was charged with sending child pornographic images and other communications over the Internet and was held on five hundred thousand dollar bond.

In his letters Brad did not complain about being locked up. He just described his environment and his coping strategies. Brad’s attorney advised him “to stay positive” and Brad seemed to take the advice seriously. He focused much of his attention on helping other inmates. He learned the details of other inmates’ stories and wrote to me about them with deep empathy. He offered informal legal advice to those who requested his help. He also spent time playing checkers or staring out the window of his cell. He and his cell mate referred to their window as “the television that is always on the Weather Channel.”

After eight months of incarceration Brad’s attorney got the bail requirement reduced to $50,000. Brad was released in Jacksonville, Florida to continue waiting for the disposition of his case. The terms of his release required that he find a job and be closely supervised by an officer of the court. Brad quickly found a minimum wage job changing tires at a tire rim plant. After a few weeks he changed jobs to work as a bagger at a super market.

While out on bail Brad finally was able to get mental health treatment. He met as often as he could with a psychologist who determined that Brad was suffering from severe depression and an obsessive compulsive disorder. He was seen by a psychiatrist who prescribed Prozac. Brad took the medication and reported that it helped control the obsessive compulsive part of his disorder. As part of the standard treatment protocol Brad’s psychiatrist conducted a clinical “risk assessment” to predict the likelihood that Brad would re-offend. Brad’s score on the assessment predicted that he was a “low risk” for future sex offenses.

After a complicated and lengthy negotiation Brad’s attorney presented what he considered to be the prosecutor’s “best offer.” The plea bargain would allow Brad to enter a guilty plea and accept a sentence of between 5 and 15 years in prison. Brad’s attorney pointed out that the eight months he had already served would apply to the sentence. He also argued that Brad’s clean criminal history and the positive psychiatric report on risk assessment could further mitigate the length of the sentence. In one of his letters Brad wrote, “There is a remote chance that the Judge could impose a 5 year sentence and suspend part of it. The balance between punishment and treatment is hers to assess.”

Brad seemed satisfied with his plea bargain and optimistic about the sentencing hearing. He asked me to consider writing a letter of support for his hearing. I was glad to write the letter and took the assignment seriously. I described my personal history with Brad and then ended the letter by saying, “I hope that you will recognize that Brad needs treatment and supervision more than he needs additional punishment.”

I have not heard from Brad since. Another friend of his who attended the sentencing hearing told me that the Judge appeared to ignore the mental health assessment and letters of support. The Judge sentenced Brad to the maximum of 15 years in prison and stated that, “I would have imposed a longer sentence if not bound by the plea agreement.” I am not a legal expert but I think Brad’s plea “bargain” was not a very good deal.

He was immediately escorted out of the court room and back into a cell. I learned that he was transferred to a state penitentiary somewhere in Florida, but I have not been able to locate him.

Brad’s sentence has added to my feelings of ambivalence about him and his situation. I continue to believe that he is a decent person who is guilty of a serious crime. I also believe that the price he is paying is out of proportion. Is it reasonable for people who commit sex crimes in cyberspace to receive harsher sentences than criminals whose comparable acts are committed in real space? Instead of long prison sentences for “low risk” sex offenders, wouldn’t communities be better off requiring the less expensive and more effective alternative of mandated mental health treatment and close supervision? Brad’s experience reinforces my opinion that the justice system is often less focused on protecting us from genuine threats and more focused on meeting our collective need for irrational revenge.


Author’s note: I recently got Brad’s new address and mailed a copy of this article to him. He corrected a few details in the story. He and his lawyer are appealing his case. They are not appealing his guilt, just the length of his sentence.

Posted by: Michael Owen | Dec 22, 2008 2:54:55 PM

I am in so much pain,and confusion. I had a physical relationship with a minor that was consensuel, and we had a kid.I was 19 and she was 14, i have strong feelings for her till this day. Her mother never said anything at first, but one day she decieded to get drunk on mother's day and told the cops about our relationship.Well then she had a baby girl her name is Autumn Marie Lee. She was born on Nov.4.2008, i was incarserated for three months, i was convicted of thrid degree sexual abuse, being my first offense they let me out on probation for 15 yrs, and i have to register as a sex offender.Well now the mother of my child is tyring to contact me. She is only 15 and has a baby girl of three months, i have not seen her at all since she was born. I can not have no contact with the (victim) or her family, and i have just been denied parental rights. I have prayed and prayed for the right way to go about this situation. Plz someone help me so that my family and I can see the newest member of our family>>

Posted by: Leon Cisneros lll | Feb 23, 2009 1:30:16 PM

I am a college student thats doing a report of sex offenders and how they feel, how they are treated, and how they think their victims feel now. I have not found anyone that is willing to give me these answers. I have a few more so if anyone can answer these questions for me please feel free to email me at kimnewville#midco.net THank you for your time.

Posted by: Kim | Mar 1, 2009 2:25:26 AM

http://courts.delaware.gov/opinions/(hrxidxu2e4ex0455pdrwhgny)/download.aspx?ID=78470
This person served 2 1/2 years for being in a Delaware State serivce center where he was ordered to go to sex offender classes and was founfd guilty of a probation violation for being in the same area with a minor and an adult who was in charge of the child ( the kicker is it was a state service center where children are there day and nightand allowed to be.
There were other sex offenders there but he was the only one found in violation, nothing happened in the parking lot , the child had no contact with the person.

Posted by: Helen | May 5, 2009 1:41:53 PM

I'm engaged to a one time sex offender he wash 15 when he committed his crime and got ten years we are now trying for a baby and I'm nervouse cps will get involved he isn't off parole yet so i don't know the rules. Theses days if your a sex offender people think your always out to get there kids i personally think that is just down right stupid. Yes there is some that area but its the ones that haven't been caught not the ones who made a mistake and got the help they needed. I think someone needs to stand up and get this changed you know that there is a sex offender in your community but what if you had a murder living next door? Thats not posted for the public to see or know about its time for people to actually get to know sex offenders and see how many of them actually regret what they did

Posted by: teprometo210 | May 15, 2011 1:01:15 AM

Post a comment

In the body of your email, please indicate if you are a professor, student, prosecutor, defense attorney, etc. so I can gain a sense of who is reading my blog. Thank you, DAB