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December 22, 2006

An all-purpose sentencing Festivus for the rest of us

Two years ago, I celebrated a Blakely Festivus for the rest of us by engaging in some Blakely airing of grievances.  I complained, for example, that it was taking a long time for a ruling in Booker.

Last year, in turn, brought a Booker Festivus for the rest of us: I kept up the grand traditions of the day by encouraging donations to the Human Fund and also by airing a new set of Booker grievances.  I complained, for example, about how the US Sentencing Commission and the Justice Department.

This year, I think I will try to be more positive by spending my energy on Festivus feats of (intellectual) strength.  Specifically, I plan to spend Festivus trying to come up with the best sentencing ideas for the coming year.  Readers are welcome and encouraged to celebrate this all-purpose sentencing Festivus by demonstrating feats of (intellectual) strength in the comments.

December 22, 2006 at 05:04 PM | Permalink

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Comments

While not a feat of intellectual strength, but one of copy and past, a link from Corrections Sentencing leads to an interesting article, Modern neuroscience is eroding the idea of free will, and within the article there is this quote:

"The British government, though, is seeking to change the law in order to lock up people with personality disorders that are thought to make them likely to commit crimes, before any crime is committed."

Are conservatives in the U.S. willing to give up the idea of free will for the sake of law and order?

Posted by: George | Dec 23, 2006 6:59:13 PM

Lock up people with personality disorders? What do you think is happening to drug offenders. These are people who are trying to self medicate. Something is wrong, but they don't know what or how to right it. I suggest pollution via chemicals, toxins, additives and more have much to do with people having "personality" disorders. Even though I am but a layman in the area of law, I have seen enough injustice to evoke education and action on my part. How about "helping" people with all and any disorders. While working to clean up our environment, we should also make major changes to the educational system in this county. Also, when you have different sets of rules for different groups, a free society cannot exist.

Posted by: Nancy Mitchell | Dec 28, 2006 7:17:51 PM

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