« Since lethal injection isn't working out... | Main | Who will be supporting the government in Claiborne and Rita? »

January 19, 2007

Ohio's new governor signs three reprieves

I predicted to my students in my Death Penalty Course yesterday that this weekend might bring some interesting Ohio capital action because an execution was scheduled (though stayed) for next Tuesday.  And now I have just seen a report that Ohio's new Governor has not even waited for the weekend.  Here's the report I saw from a state news agency:

[On Friday], the governor signed warrants that delay the executions of three Death Row inmates who were scheduled to receive lethal injections in January or February.  The warrants provide the new governor additional time to review the sentences imposed on Kenneth Biros, James Filiaggi and Christopher Newton.

This brief AP report states that "Biros was granted a reprieve until March 20, Filiaggi to April 24, and Newton to May 24."   Among other interesting aspects of this development is that Christopher Newton is a so-called "volunteer" who has dropped his appeals.  Will the "right to die" crowd to come out and complain about Newton having his death wish delayed?

Of course, the place to go to get all the details (and the likely storm of new coverage) is the Ohio Death Penalty Information blog.

January 19, 2007 at 04:23 PM | Permalink

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451574769e200d8350fa69169e2

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Ohio's new governor signs three reprieves:

Comments

This is just cute. Strickland apparently doesn't give a hoot about the families of these victims who have been waiting a long time for justice to be carried out. Then, of course, because he's a politician, he's not going to commute these sentences . . . . after all, why toss away political capital for a murderer? So he will get to placate the criminal-loving moonbats, but still satisfy the law and order folks. Three months to figure out whether a death sentence is justified? Ridiculous. Ohio would be better served with its governor trying to figure out how to strengthen its economy.

Posted by: federalist | Jan 19, 2007 5:14:21 PM

professor berman:

im not sure if you meant your comment about the "'right to die' crowd" facetiously, but surely the right to drop one's appeals is not tantamount to the right to die and surely the right to die is not equivalent to the right to be executed by the state in the name of its citizens.

while i may or may not agree with your oft-expressed frustration that the death penalty receives disproportionate attention in our civic discourse regarding sentencing issues, im not sure that the solution is to coarsen that discourse.

Posted by: dm | Jan 19, 2007 10:00:11 PM

Please don't coursen the discourse? Funnier is the choice between moonbats and law and order. I'd much rather be the moonbat.

Posted by: Major Mori | Jan 20, 2007 10:30:19 AM

DM: I do not mean to coarsen the discourse, but I do mean to highlight that the same folks who seek to safeguard the rights of the terminally ill to commit suicide tend to be the same folks who seek to oppose the efforts of the terminally punished to essentially commit suicide.

Of course, the irony runs to other groups, too. Those often opposed to ill persons' right to die are frequently also willing (and perhaps even eager) to have certain other persons' killed by the state.

Posted by: Doug B. | Jan 20, 2007 4:23:29 PM

professor berman:

it may be that there are many in america who favor the "right to die" who also oppose the death penalty. surely there is no contradiction there. im not sure, however, that there are many americans who are even aware of the phenomenon of "volunteer-ism." and im not aware of any evidence that those who favor the "right to die" disproportionately oppose the the right to "volunteer."

but more importantly, the right to suicide and the right to be executed are in no way equivalent. those who favor the right to die might -- and i believe, should -- favor the right of those on death row to take their own life. but this is far cry from believing that those on death row have right to be executed. the former is an autonomous act; the latter implicates us all.

Posted by: dm | Jan 20, 2007 7:50:38 PM

Fair points, DM, and exactly the ones I want folks thinking about, especially because many who oppose the right to die think (perhaps properly) that many (if not all) acts of suicide "implicates us all." And, of course,
the connections become even closer particularly when the right to die community argues for the right to (state-licensed) physician help with any life termination decision.

Also, would the right to die community favor giving persons who are sentenced to die (or even sentenced to life imprisonment) access to life-ending drugs? Persons in these situations are often denied the means to make the "autnoomous choice" that the right to die community seeks to preserve for others -- which is why death row prisoners are often left with little choice for ending their lives other than to volunteer for execution.

Posted by: Doug B. | Jan 21, 2007 12:51:07 PM

you are absolutely right, those who favor the right to die ought to favor it on an equal basis for those on death row. i certainly believe that those on death row should, under certain circumstances, be entitled to drugs in order to end their life. but whatever one thinks about that act, it is not an execution.

i suppose some believe that the right to die "implicates us all" in some general sense. but surely there is a fundamental difference between (a) an act that the state allows (and perhaps should prohibit) and (b) an act that the state itself performs. the state allowing or prohibiting self-killing, whatever one thinks about it, is not the same thing as the state itself killing, whatever one thinks about it. am i wrong to think that this is a rather significant distinction?

last october when michael johnson stabbed himself to death just hours before the was to be executed by the state of texas, i interpreted it as a sad but courageous act of personal liberation. but again, however one interprets that act, surely it was not an execution.

Posted by: dm | Jan 21, 2007 6:46:45 PM

xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES xxx-MOVIES

Posted by: DFDF | Jul 29, 2007 1:11:22 AM

odalys garcia desnuda vaginal insertion torture <a href=http://www.pressreleasepoint.com/user/decideklufc>gary roberts comix</a> . <a href="http://www.pressreleasepoint.com/user/decideklufc">gary roberts comix</a> . . <a href=http://www.pressreleasepoint.com/user/exportationuion>free music downloads</a> . <a href="http://www.pressreleasepoint.com/user/exportationuion">free music downloads

Posted by: twelfthytcemo | Mar 18, 2009 6:08:35 PM

Post a comment

In the body of your email, please indicate if you are a professor, student, prosecutor, defense attorney, etc. so I can gain a sense of who is reading my blog. Thank you, DAB