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March 14, 2007

Interesting new report from The Sentencing Project

I just received an announcement concerning this interesting-looking new report from The Sentencing Project:

The Sentencing Project has released a new study reporting growing momentum for sentencing reform designed to limit prison population growth and reduce ballooning corrections budgets in the United States.

Changing Direction? State Sentencing Reforms 2004-2006 finds that at least 22 states have enacted sentencing reforms in the past three years.  The report further identifies that the most popular approach for reducing prison crowding -- implemented by 13 states -- was the diversion of low-level drug offenders from prison to drug treatment programs.  Additional policy changes included:

  • expansion of alternatives to incarceration for non-violent offenders;
  • parole and probation reforms designed either to reduce time served in prison or to provide supervision options to reduce the number of revocations to prison; and
  • broader sentencing reform, such as modifying controversial mandatory minimum sentencing laws.

Changing Direction? State Sentencing Reforms 2004-2006 argues that in order to build on these positive legislative developments, lawmakers must continue to enact evidence-based criminal justice policies. Recommendations of The Sentencing Project urge that policymakers:

  • expand the use of drug treatment as a sentencing option;
  • utilize intermediate sanctions for technical violations of parole and probation;
  • repeal mandatory minimum sentences; and
  • reconsider sentence lengths.

March 14, 2007 at 03:57 PM | Permalink

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Comments

I am the relative of someone who has been incarcerated. It is a first time offense, and I was wondering if the law is changing where a person spends 65% of their sentence instead of having to pull 85%. I hear that there is a new law that is suposed to go into effect this month concerning this. Could you please tell me if this is correct? Thank you very much!

Posted by: M | Jul 9, 2007 10:34:15 PM

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