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April 5, 2007

Nevada explores "solutions" to prison overcrowding

Thanks to this post at Think Outside the Cage, I see that Nevada is thinking about taking the release approach to dealing with its prison overcrowding problems.  This local article provides some details:

About 1,600 inmates would qualify to be released from Nevada prisons if lawmakers approve a bill that doubles the time credits inmates receive for good behavior, a prison spokesman said Tuesday.  And, the sentences for about 2,000 other inmates on parole would expire under the measure, designed to offer some relief to the state's crowded prisons, said Fritz Scholtman, spokesman for the Department of Corrections....

Lawmakers are grappling with a prison system that is over-budget and faces inmate population projections that demand billions of dollars in new prison construction unless new policies are developed or laws are changed.... "We are currently over our emergency capacity," [Corrections Department head Howard] Skolnik said.  The department has added beds across the state, but the numbers continue to rise, he said.

April 5, 2007 at 04:51 PM | Permalink

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Comments

This is such a "cop out". This does nothing to address the systemic reasons for overcrowding and is nothing more than a short term solution.

Posted by: Gideon | Apr 5, 2007 8:20:20 PM

I suspect they may be trying to beat an order from a federal court to depopulate their prisons. They said they were in an emergency over capacity stage which may mean they are in violation of a previous court order. This is not an uncommon situation for a state prison. The public in general is not very interested in building and operating more prisons but the majority are also not interested in letting prisoners out early unless there is a crisis.

Retribution is very popular (harsh penalties get near unanimous votes). Rehabilitation works for some prisoners (mostly young first time offenders) and not for others. Long term solutions would involve revising sentencing policies and making efforts to reduce recidivism. I don't know if the political atmosphere in Nevada would support implementing long term solutions. Several states have managed to reduce the size of their prison population and the others are under pressure to do the same.

Posted by: John Neff | Apr 5, 2007 9:23:05 PM

did this bill pass?and if so,when would it take effect?would prisoners' time be retroactive?

Posted by: Daniel | May 21, 2007 8:47:42 PM

I was visiting a friend in Nevada State Prison this weekend (6/23-24/07). A woman was organizing a demonstration against the Parole Board for 6/26/07. Her son was in NSP for 30 years. she said the Parole Board;
1)Knowingly violated the open meeting law from
2003 to date.
2)Do not parole most eligible men.

The Govenor should remove Parole Board;
Chair-Dorla Salling-
comm. Thomas Goodson
Do not reappoint on 6/30/07 to the Parole Board; Tami Bass and Connie Bisbee

Posted by: Janell | Jun 26, 2007 12:05:01 AM

I am a loved one of an inmate of the NDOC. Unless you have a loved one or a friend in the NDOC people do not realize the crap the NDOC gets away with. The officals with the NDOC have blown this figure way out of the water(1600). The law, AB510 was passed effective July 1, 2007. Please do not believe the hype that the NDOC are happy about this law because they are not. In fact, I believe that the NDOC will find ways of charging inmates with additional charges that will take their (inmates) good time/stat time credits away which in effect will make the inmate do more time the necessary. I know that I am not the only one that knows the NDOC feel that they can do whatever they want to these inmates and when the NDOC are called to account they retailate against the inmate one way or another. Who are the crimnals here? Remember this is a good ol boy state - they pat each others backs.

Posted by: Dawn | Aug 24, 2007 8:01:45 PM

I believe each individual case sshould be taken into consideration. The state of Nevada has its own old west-type justice. Some people really get a raw deal. My close friend is in there for 105 yrs. No one killed or hurt in commission of crimes, but he made some high ups pretty mad. So the early release program could not help much for him. REHABILITATION needs to be the focus for the state of Nevada. That is the answer. But first you have to rehabilitate the officials from all there corruption and twisted thinking. That seems a long way off for a money state. How sad that is for human beings caught in the political nightmare and used as mere pawns in a sick game of usually wealthy men.

Posted by: Jennnifer | Apr 17, 2008 4:13:10 PM

My wife is doing her time at FMWCC at 4370 Smiley Rd Las Vegas, NV 89115-1808. She has been telling me that there is a Bill pending. Called the " Forgiveness Bill " . I have to fly from Ma 4 times a year not counting the phone calls. Is there any truth to this BILL ? Or is it just prison yard gossip ?? If you could tell me anything it would be of great help. Respectfully Yours, Tom

Posted by: Tom | Jun 29, 2008 9:45:43 AM

I have a loved one in NDOC, and is a model prisoner. Recently one of his friends was hired to train as a guard where he is. The guard in training would wave and shake hands when they saw each other or passed by. To say the least other inmates were noticing this. In one of our phone conversations we asked if we should ask the friend to stop waving and acknowledging. The next day the inmate was locked into segregation 24/7 and has been there for almost 3 months. Guards are saying that segregation could be for 6 to 12 months and that all of this time does not count towards release. What kind of guard who is training would allow this behavior from a trainee, knowing it could endanger an inmate. Also I spoke to an attorney and they said that to do anything would make it worse making the inmate a target.

Posted by: Mary | Jul 24, 2008 4:37:11 PM

The bill did pass to allow double good time credits to be earned but it did not strip the parole board of their descretionary duty to parole rehabilitated inmates and deny ineligible inmates. The bill does not mandate that the inmates will be paroled sooner, only that they are eligible to receive more good time credits which would make them eligible to be seen by the parole board sooner. A lot of inmates and families automatically assume the inmate will be paroled earlier and it is not the case.

Posted by: Factor X | Jul 30, 2008 3:04:01 PM

my boy friend was sentenced 16 to 72 months for burglary they told him he has to expire now there taking him back to the board the system is all screwedup

Posted by: debbie | Dec 13, 2008 10:48:04 PM

I am the parentof 4 victims of a child Molester housed at LCC and a criminal justice student. I disagree with this child molester getting double good time. He has ruined 4 lives because he wanted sexual satisfaction from children and he is a very coniving con-artist. He uses single mothers w/children and if he gets out, there will be more victims. He had tried it w/his younger brother, his neice and his own children. If anyone thinks this man (dare I call him a man) deserves to get out then they better rethink their stance. This man is a danger to all children.He cannot be rehabilitated because he thinks what he did was right for my children. Anyone who harms a child should not recieve ANY good time. I will do anything I can within the law to make sure this man never gets out to harm and destroy anymore childrens lives

Posted by: Surette | Dec 17, 2008 2:01:58 AM

I am the parentof 4 victims of a child Molester housed at LCC and a criminal justice student. I disagree with this child molester getting double good time. He has ruined 4 lives because he wanted sexual satisfaction from children and he is a very coniving con-artist. He uses single mothers w/children and if he gets out, there will be more victims. He had tried it w/his younger brother, his neice and his own children. If anyone thinks this man (dare I call him a man) deserves to get out then they better rethink their stance. This man is a danger to all children.He cannot be rehabilitated because he thinks what he did was right for my children. Anyone who harms a child should not recieve ANY good time. I will do anything I can within the law to make sure this man never gets out to harm and destroy anymore childrens lives

Posted by: Surette | Dec 17, 2008 2:03:14 AM

my boyfriend was just denied mandatory parole after serving half his sentence already 16 to 72 months hes been down 33 months on a burglary charge now he has to expire and there very over crowded there goes the tax payers money right out the window

Posted by: debbie | Jan 5, 2009 4:16:46 PM

I was wondering if they are passing a revised law for the inmates with A-B offenses with no enhancements that will take 33% off the front number and 40% off the back number. "Have you heard anything like that." I heard that they were voting on that this month, and if they are when will they post that outcome.

Posted by: Shelly Ingram | Nov 15, 2010 10:46:46 AM

GPS tracking systems are only a small part of what it takes to keep our children safe from sexual predators. First of all, legislators need to ensure that these sex offenders cannot reside anywhere near children. Police need to spend less time hiding with their radar guns to give speeding tickets and more time monitoring areas where sex offenders reside. GPS tracking bracelets are a must! The people monitoring GPS trackers most be competent and knowledgeable.

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