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August 26, 2007

Press coverage of important work on sentencing realities

Sunday's Providence Journal has this effective feature story about the important "ground-level" work on federal sentencing reforms being done by Prof. David Zlotnick (previously discussed here).  Here is the start of the article:

In political terms, they are often viewed as liberal grievances, such as the disparity in sentences for crack versus powder cocaine, and life sentences handed out to nonviolent or first-time drug offenders. But these objections come from federal judges appointed by Republican presidents such as Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush. And for that reason, their comments offer guideposts for those searching for practical, bipartisan proposals to change federal sentencing laws, according to Roger Williams University law Prof. David M. Zlotnick.

After 4½ years of work, Zlotnick has compiled 40 case studies in which federal judges appointed by GOP presidents complained that sentences required by law were excessive, and he has placed his research on a Web site so it can be used in the upcoming debate in Congress over proposed changes in crack cocaine penalties . "By showing that Republican appointees share many of the same concerns as academics and criminal defense attorneys, I hope to explode the myth of the liberal federal judiciary and pave the way for meaningful and bipartisan sentencing reform," Zlotnick wrote.

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August 26, 2007 at 12:09 PM | Permalink

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Comments

"I hope to explode the myth ..."

-In case anyone doubted that Zlotnick was a real professor...

Posted by: | Aug 27, 2007 7:14:01 AM

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