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April 9, 2008

Official coverage of President Bush signing the Second Chance Act

Now available on the White House's official website is this press release with the heading, "President Bush Signs H.R. 1593, the Second Chance Act of 2007."  Here are a few excerpts from the statements of the President of the United States that many lawyers might find useful to quote whenever they address state and federal sentencing judges throughout the United States:

I'm about to sign a piece of legislation that will help give prisoners across America a second chance for a better life.  This bill is going to support the caring men and women who help America's prisoners find renewal and hope.

I can't thank the folks who care enough about a fellow citizen to offer their love and compassion. It's through the acts of mercy that compassionate Americans are making the nation a more hopeful place, and I want to thank you all for joining us today....

The country was built on the belief that each human being has limitless potential and worth. Everybody matters.  We believe that even those who have struggled with a dark past can find brighter days ahead.  One way we act on that belief is by helping former prisoners who've paid for their crimes -- we help them build new lives as productive members of our society.

The work of redemption reflects our values. It also reflects our national interests.  Each year, approximately 650,000 prisoners are released from jail.  Unfortunately, an estimated two-thirds of them are rearrested within three years.  The high recidivism rate places a huge financial burden on taxpayers, it deprives our labor force of productive workers, and it deprives families of their daughters and sons, and husbands and wives, and moms and dads.

Our government has a responsibility to help prisoners to return as contributing members of their community.  But this does not mean that the government has all the answers.  Some of the most important work to help ex-convicts is done outside of Washington, D.C., in faith-based communities and community-based groups. It's done on streets and small town community centers. It's done in churches and synagogues and temples and mosques.

I like to call the folks who are engaged in this compassionate work, "members of the armies of compassion."  They help addicts and users break the chains of addiction. They help former prisoners find a ride to work and a meal to eat and place to stay.  These men and women are answering the call to love their neighbors as they'd like to be loved themselves.  And in the process, they're helping prisoners replace anger and suffering and despair with faith and hope and love.

The bill I'm signing today, the Second Chance Act of 2007, will build on work to help prisoners reclaim their lives.  In other words, it basically says: We're standing with you, not against you....

In [various] ways, the Second Chance Act will live up to its name; will help ensure that where the prisoner's spirit is willing, the community's resources are available. It will help our armies of compassion use their healing touch so lost souls can rediscover their dignity and sense of purpose....

And now it is my honor to sign this important piece of legislation.  May God bless the country, and may God bless those who are trying to help.  Thank you very much.

Though I have never had the honor and privilege to serve in the US Armed Forces, I like the idea that I am a foot soldier in our nation's many "armies of compassion."  I also like hearing President Bush ask God to help me for trying to help those who have made a mistake in their lives but need and perhaps even deserve a second chance.  The President's inspiring words make me proud to be an American, despite the ugly realities of our collective blissful ignorance about the many economic and human cost of mass incarceration, and I am excited that I am going to go teach a Legislation class in which the signing of this important piece of federal legislation will be the first substantive topic for discussion.

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April 9, 2008 at 01:19 PM | Permalink

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Comments

Does this bill do anything other than give millions in taxpayer dollars to church groups so they can force jesus up the sore and vulnerable assholes of newly-released prisoners?

Posted by: bruce | Apr 9, 2008 2:13:55 PM

I agree what exactly is H.R. 1593 going to do? I would like to see it take the title of felon off first time non violent offenders after a certain amount of time. That would be a start.

Posted by: | Apr 9, 2008 2:54:49 PM

I wondered if the SCA will help offenders retroactivly? In other words what about offenders who completed their sentence before the SCA was signed into law. And will it help folks who only did probation.

Posted by: Paul | Apr 9, 2008 3:43:40 PM

So why are they excluding sex offenders from this "second chance" act? Everyone deserves a 2nd chance, IMO.

Posted by: ZMan | Apr 9, 2008 6:03:55 PM

Does it really exclude sex offenders? Not that I'd be surprised, in fact I'd expect as much.

Posted by: bruce | Apr 9, 2008 8:31:59 PM

What happened to Charlie Rangel bill? No matter how much help you get from the church, community, you will still be a convicted felon. How's having a degree going to help you when the record still show that you are a convicted felon? This bill is a joke. Incidentally, as usual congress only do thing half assed.

Posted by: | Apr 10, 2008 12:22:15 PM

Where is the second chance? I agree if you are a convicted felon what kind of job can you hope for?
We need to find a way to remove the felon label before we move forward. Before anyone gets bent out of shape I am mainly talking about the non violent offender who has lived a law abiding life since conviction. I say that would be 5-10 years after the conviction.

Posted by: | Apr 10, 2008 3:10:25 PM

Bruce, you're disgusting.

Posted by: | Apr 10, 2008 4:47:56 PM

Ever heard of the separation of church and state, asshole? I guess that's why you like Bush. He doesn't know the difference either. Impeach and throw his felonious ass in gitmo

Posted by: | Jul 11, 2008 1:23:15 PM

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