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September 29, 2008

A religious pitch for drug courts

This new paper posted at SSRN, titled "An Argument for Providing Drug Courts in All Alabama Counties Based on Judeo-Christian Ethics," provides a religious pitch for drug courts.  Here is the abstract:

A drug court is an alternative process in the criminal justice system for eligible nonviolent drug offenders that focuses on treatment and allows successful defendants to avoid prison time and a criminal record. This article first provides a snap-shot of the availability of drug courts both nationwide and in Alabama and presents two strong arguments supporting the drug court alternative.  The first argument summarizes the substantial evidence indicating that the drug court alternative costs taxpayers substantially less money and enhances public safety.  The second and even more compelling argument illustrates that the moral principles of Judeo-Christian ethics, which require laws to be compassionate towards the sick and support the reasonable opportunity of each person to reach their potential as well as condemn oppressive laws imposing excessive punishment, compel all Alabamians of faith to insist that political leaders adopt an appropriate plan that implements drug courts on all sixty-seven of the state's counties.

September 29, 2008 at 03:57 PM | Permalink

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Comments

my son filled 2 flase perscriptions in dothan Al. He was sentented to 15 years.Somethins not right with this sentence.I need help in getting him a early parole cut.on a non violate crime. some one explain.we are in fl.and this is unreal for that sentence.Help me

Posted by: patsy skipper | Sep 30, 2008 10:06:02 PM

I live in Alabama. I took a drug charge for someone else. I was told with no priors, no criminal past, that this would result in a slap on the wrist. Let me say, this was not true. I am in drug court and it is very expensive. I pay $20 every time they call my color at random. Which actually equates to being in bondage to this system 24/7 because, you never know when you will have to go report in. Then there are fees for monitoring which range from $75 to $40 a month. Plus there are court dates to report in every month. And, then you have to have 10 of these meetings a month to go to. Finally, there is the time and gasoline issue to deal with. I hurt my back and went to the ER and was prescribed medicine for the pain. I was told not to take anything that wasn't prescribed to me when I entered this program. As soon as I reported and showed my medicine that was prescribed to me...I spent 7 days in the County Jail. Remember I am not a drug addict..look at what I am having to go through. This program is a mess. I think if I was addicted to drugs it would not be benificial at all. This is a program for the State to make money off of who ever they can.

Posted by: Marilyn | Oct 3, 2008 6:33:15 PM

I live in Arizona. I took a drug charge for someone else. I was told with no priors, no criminal past, that this would result in a slap on the wrist. Let me say, this was not true. I am in drug court and it is very expensive. I pay $20 every time they call my color at random. Which actually equates to being in bondage to this system 24/7 because, you never know when you will have to go report in. Then there are fees for monitoring which range from $75 to $40 a month. Plus there are court dates to report in every month. And, then you have to have 10 of these meetings a month to go to. Finally, there is the time and gasoline issue to deal with. I hurt my back and went to the ER and was prescribed medicine for the pain.

=====================================
Michael
alabama drug rehab

Posted by: Michael | Nov 27, 2008 6:26:51 AM

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