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November 13, 2008

"Distributive Principles of Criminal Law: Who Should be Punished How Much?"

Via e-mail, I just received an announcement about Paul Robinson's new book, which is titled "Distributive Principles of Criminal Law: Who Should be Punished How Much."  This Amazon entry provides links to small parts of the book and this product description:

The rules governing who will be punished and how much determine a society's success in two of its most fundamental functions: doing justice and protecting citizens from crime.  Drawing from the existing theoretical literature and adding to it recent insights from the social sciences, Paul Robinson describes the nature of the practical challenge in setting rational punishment principles, how past efforts have failed, and the alternatives that have been tried.  He ultimately proposes a principle for distributing criminal liability and punishment that will be most likely to do justice and control crime.

Paul Robinson is one of the world's leading criminal law experts.  He has been writing about criminal liability and punishment issues for three decades, and has published dozens of influential articles in the best scholarly journals.  This long-awaited volume is a brilliant synthesis of social science research and legal reasoning that brings together three decades of work in a compelling line of argument that addresses all of the important issues in assessing liability and punishment.

November 13, 2008 at 05:13 PM | Permalink

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Comments

I am a criminal defense lawyer.

I have a difficult federal case coming up for sentencing with guidelines that are far too high and would appreciate any guidance on whether this book might be have any insights for a sentencing memo.

Posted by: john minock | Nov 14, 2008 10:55:54 AM

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In the body of your email, please indicate if you are a professor, student, prosecutor, defense attorney, etc. so I can gain a sense of who is reading my blog. Thank you, DAB