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November 4, 2008

VOTE, VOTe, VOte, Vote, vote, votE, voTE, vOTE, VOTE...

or you have much less moral authority for complaining about the nature and direction of American laws and society!!

In my sleepy little Ohio hamlet, I had to wait in line for nearly an hour to cast my vote on a touch-screen machine.  (This wait was about 10 times longer than it has ever taken me to vote, and I am actually proud and excited that I finally got to stand in a line to vote.)

I have done lots and lots and lots of sentencing-related election blogging, but typepad's lousy new archive technology means that only the most recent posts can be found in the archive Campaign 2008 and sentencing issues.  In any event, here are links to some major posts I have done on issues that remain lively this election day:

November 4, 2008 at 09:48 AM | Permalink

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Comments

I disagree. People that fail to go to law school lack the moral authority to complain about our laws. Likewise, people should develop relationships with decision-makers long before any votes are cast.

While voting is good for the soul, it doesn’t really mean that you have a say in specific policies.

PS: I will say that from the pictures on the internet, that Americans set a good example for the rest of the world in terms of how to vote and how to decide issues. Compared to Europeans our campaigns are actually MORE issue-dominated, and compared to the rest of the world we know how to vote without getting violent.

Posted by: S.cotus | Nov 4, 2008 10:58:01 AM

You're right Doug. No vote=no complaints. It's so important to this country that we change direction, and the only way to do that is to VOTE.

Dare I even touch that ridiculous statement that those who don't go to, excuse me, who fail to go to law school lack the moral authority to complain. With limited enrollments in law school, how is it even possible for every person, or even the majority of people to go to law school? Stop acting like it's this major accomplishment to graduate from law school. It's not. We've all been there. It's not hard, it's just alot. And it doesn't make you morally superior. Because in some ways, obviously, you're now morally inferior.

Posted by: babalu | Nov 4, 2008 11:58:44 AM

The elections are a scam. I'm still voting for Ralph Nader and encouraging others to disassociate themselves from the GOP and the Democrats by voting third-party but the truth is that the vast majority of the people are sheep too stupid to recognize that they've been habitually fooled.

The Ludwig von Mises Institute has a great article on this point:
http://mises.org/story/3170

So go ahead and feel good about voting if that's your thing. Who am I to spoil your fun? We're all just pawns in the grand chess game.

Posted by: Aman Sharma | Nov 4, 2008 12:29:47 PM

Babalu, Thank you for addressing my argument.

I agree with you on one thing. It is not a major accomplishment to graduate from law school. Everyone I know has. Everyone in my family has. Indeed, even as child I was long forbidden from associating with non-lawyers over 25, and I had plenty of people to associate with. Real accomplishments comes AFTER law school. So, I am 100% in agreement with you: law school is no major accomplishment. It is a necessary but not sufficient part of being an American!

Many times have I listed to people drone on and on about how people should enlist in the armed forces as the one means of showing their patriotism. (For some reason, most student members of the Federalist Society can substitute organizing a buffet or meet-and-greet for military service.) There does not seem to be any objections to the suggestion that military service is a show of patriotism. Unfortunately, military service doesn’t require the same level of intellectual commitment as law school does. Sure, some people may disagree with me, but they are not lawyers and wouldn’t understand.

USA #1

Posted by: S.cotus | Nov 4, 2008 2:32:15 PM

S.cotus. I really do think you talents are being lost here. Why throw pearls before swine. You need to head to Hollywood or Vegas and get on the Comedy Channel. You could be raking in the bucks rather than getting a few chuckles out of us legal geeks.

Posted by: Daniel | Nov 4, 2008 4:07:07 PM

I must respectfully disagree with the premise that one who fails to vote lacks "moral authority" to complain. What if the complaint is that both major parties have gone astray? What if the complaint is that the winner so often claims his popular vote tally is a "mandate" to subvert the will of the people?

I think the premise holds true only when the "complainer" fails to vote to oust a candidate and complains about him during a second or subsequent term.

Posted by: Texas Lawyer | Nov 4, 2008 5:05:39 PM

"People that fail to go to law school lack the moral authority to complain about our laws. Likewise, people should develop relationships with decision-makers long before any votes are cast."

You just pissed on your whole argument above with this statement.

"While voting is good for the soul, it doesn’t really mean that you have a say in specific policies."

And the importance of going to law school to vote is...what?

Posted by: a'e | Nov 10, 2008 4:18:00 PM

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