« "Justice Kennedy laments the state of prisons in California, U.S." | Main | Noting big (and wasteful?) budget growth in federal prison spending »

February 4, 2010

Ohio completes third successful one-drug lethal injection

As detailed in this local Columbus Dispatch story, which is headlined "Convenience-store killer executed by lethal injection," the Buckeye state has now completed three "uneventful" executions using its new one-drug execution protocol.  Here is how the article starts:

After 16 years of litigation capped by a last-minute flurry of appeals in four courts, Mark Brown was executed this morning for gunning down a Youngstown store owner and an employee in Youngstown market.

Brown, 37, was declared dead at 10:49 a.m. at the Southern Ohio Correctional Facility near Lucasville. Brown had no last words.  He was the third person put to death in the nation using Ohio's one-drug lethal injection process.  The chemical started flowing at 10:40 a.m. At 10:41 Brown closed his eyes and yawned.  He was silent and there was movement after that.

After the execution, Terri Rasul, sister of victim Isam Salman, said, "As sad as this may be, justice has been served.  I hope this is a lesson learned by young people today to not do what Mark Brown did to my brother."

Some recent related posts:

February 4, 2010 at 11:42 AM | Permalink

TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
http://www.typepad.com/services/trackback/6a00d83451574769e20120a8603c45970b

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Ohio completes third successful one-drug lethal injection:

Comments

I cannot help but feel revulsion from the barbarity of testing this little-understood procedure on humans. I can only imagine the intense pain that Mark Brown unlikely felt.

Posted by: Res ipsa | Feb 4, 2010 1:36:40 PM

Lessee, he was 37 when executed, and let's say his life expectancy was 30 more years in prison. This execution probably saved some money, especially when you consider the possibility of medical care when he got older. And think of all the greenhouse gases that will not be generated.

Posted by: federalist | Feb 4, 2010 2:31:38 PM

"Lessee, he was 37 when executed, and let's say his life expectancy was 30 more years in prison. This execution probably saved some money, especially when you consider the possibility of medical care when he got older."

Do you think saving money is a legitimate reason to put people to death?

Posted by: JC | Feb 4, 2010 3:39:07 PM

JC, the argument is that capital punishment is too expensive . . . .

Posted by: federalist | Feb 4, 2010 4:19:49 PM

JC --

"Do you think saving money is a legitimate reason to put people to death?"

No. Their committing grotesque murders is a legitimate reason to put them to death.

Posted by: Bill Otis | Feb 4, 2010 4:33:59 PM

"JC, the argument is that capital punishment is too expensive . . . ."

I'm opposed to capital punishment on moral grounds, although I recognize that there are also economic arguments to be made. I prefer not to rely on economic claims, though, because the financial cost of litigation is really just a tangential issue as far as I'm concerned.

So I'll ask you again: do you think that saving money is a legitimate reason to put people to death?

Posted by: JC | Feb 4, 2010 5:42:15 PM

No. I don't think that saving money is a legitimate reason to execute someone. My post was meant to be a little tongue-in-cheek. I 100% agree with you that economics are a "tangential" issue.

People should be put to death for committing horrible crimes.

Posted by: federalist | Feb 5, 2010 9:22:47 AM

Do people not realize there are more painful and more inhumane ways to die. There will always be a flaw no matter what you use in capital punishment.

Posted by: Naomi | Feb 10, 2010 9:46:35 AM

Post a comment

In the body of your email, please indicate if you are a professor, student, prosecutor, defense attorney, etc. so I can gain a sense of who is reading my blog. Thank you, DAB