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April 29, 2010

Intriguing little Ninth Circuit ruling rejecting various challenges to denial of parole

For anyone too quick to assume that defendants always win in the Ninth Circuit with novel constitutional claims, consider checking out today's panel ruling in Moor v. Palmer, No. 07-16045 (9th Cir. Apr. 29, 2010) (available here).  In Moor, a Ninth Circuit panel rejects a variety of intriguing constitutional complaints from a Nevada state prison complaining in a habeas petition about the denial of his parole.  I do not think the ruling breaks any significant new jurisprudential ground, but it does effectively review the array of (often not successful) constitutional claims that can be raised in this setting.

April 29, 2010 at 02:48 PM | Permalink

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Comments

But doesn't the federal law say that production of CP is only 30 years max? How did he get life? But it did suit him better to be prosecuted by the state because he got his parole terms, where there is no parole in federal cases.

Posted by: N/A | Apr 29, 2010 3:46:12 PM

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