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April 29, 2010

Researchers requesting information on attorney plea and jury selection strategies

I have been contacted by a doctoral student in legal psychology at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, who has kindly asked for me to post the following formation about research she and a colleague are doing on attorney judgment strategies in plea negotiations and during jury selection:

Plea Bargaining Research Study (prosecutors and defense attorney participants needed): Researchers at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice are conducting a study investigating the factors that influence attorneys' plea bargaining decisions.  The study is conducted online and takes approximately 20 minutes to complete.  Participants will receive $30 for their participation, payable by check or PayPal.  Participants will be asked to assume the role of an attorney in a robbery case.  Participants will receive case information (police reports, witness statements) and will be asked questions about how they would proceed with plea negotiations.  The results of this study will be disseminated in academic journals and in presentations at academic conferences.  We will share the results of the study with participants when it is completed.  If you are interested in participating in the study, please contact Caroline Crocker at [email protected] to receive a link to the online study and a personal identification number.  This study is funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation and is supervised by Dr. Steven Penrod.

Jury Selection Decision Making Study (prosecuting attorney participants needed): Researchers at John Jay College of Criminal Justice are conducting an online study on jury selection funded by the National Science Foundation.  The study takes approximately 20 minutes to complete and pays $35.  We are recruiting attorney participants from all over the country.  This study is being supervised by Dr. Margaret Bull Kovera.  Results of this study will be disseminated in peer reviewed psycholegal journals, such as Law and Human Behavior, and results will be published as aggregate data; attorneys' names will never be linked to their data.  Attorneys who participate in the study will be asked to read a short trial summary and a potential juror profile, and then asked to answer some brief questions about the potential juror. Interested attorneys can contact the researcher for this study, Julia Kennard, at [email protected].  We will share the results of the study with participants when the study is completed.

April 29, 2010 at 02:27 PM | Permalink

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Comments

Empirical studies are needed in the law. However, how does one measure laziness, idiocy, arbitrary feelings, careerism, the desire to get into the paper, all wielded at the point of a gun. This gun is held to the heads of a groups of people whose fraction of innocence is unknown.

Here is something empirical that we know. Only one in ten serious felonies is answered by these incompetents. They and their judges allow 23 million felonies, 5 million being violent, each year. They protect guilty criminals from incapacitation. They loose very busy predators on neighborhoods where people with dark skins live and no lawyers live. They go after easy cases, especially against rich people. The illegal alien paramilitary gangs, who behead people who offended them, go nearly unmolested or inconvenienced by these incompetents.

It gets worse. They are at will employees. If they ever want to get within smelling distance of their pensions, they will do as they politician puppet masters tell them. These politician puppet masters are themselves incompetent lawyer dumbasses.

Posted by: Supremacy Claus | May 2, 2010 10:46:50 PM

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