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March 7, 2014

"Criminal Records, Race and Redemption"

The title of this post is the title of this notable paper I just noticed via SSRN authored by Michael Pinard. Here is the abstract:

Poor individuals of color disproportionately carry the weight of a criminal record. They confront an array of legal and non-legal barriers, the most prominent of which are housing and employment.  Federal, State and local governments are implementing measures aimed at easing the everlasting impact of a criminal record.  However, these measures, while laudable, fail to address the disconnection between individuals who believe they have moved past their interactions with the criminal justice system and the ways in which decision makers continue to judge them in the years and decades following those interactions.  These issues are particularly pronounced for poor individuals of color, who are uniquely stigmatized by their criminal records.

To address these issues, this article proposes a redemption-focused approach to criminal records.  This approach recognizes that individuals ultimately move past their interactions with the criminal justice system and, therefore, they should no longer be saddled by their criminal records.  Thus, the article calls for greatly expanding laws that allow individuals to remove their criminal records from public access and, in the end, allow them to reach redemption.

March 7, 2014 at 12:29 PM | Permalink

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Comments

I have come to admire the creativity of the pro-criminal side. For those who need a translation, the marvelous phrase, "interaction with the criminal justice system" = "knocking over the 7-11 by sticking a revolver in the clerk's ear."

Posted by: Bill Otis | Mar 7, 2014 11:37:04 PM

Oh, bite me otis...this is about people who have already paid their price through the justice system for there crimes and are just striving in the hopes to re-establish and assimilate back into society and be a positive contributing member again. What a sad unforgiving POS member of the human race you seem to be.

Posted by: Brad Vance | Mar 10, 2014 8:12:29 PM

"Oh, bite me otis..."

Another message from the seventh grade. Far out.

"...this is about people who have already paid their price through the justice system for there crimes and are just striving in the hopes to re-establish and assimilate back into society and be a positive contributing member again."

Actually, it's about the increasingly frequent anthem of racial whinerism, in which the notion that being black is The Uniform Excuse for Everything is about an eighth of an inch below the surface. This has, among numerous other problems, the defect of assuming that blacks have less free will and personal responsibility than anyone else.

But putting that to one side, where's your evidence that these criminals were "contributing members of society" to start with? Or have any desire to contribute to anyone but themselves?

"What a sad unforgiving POS member of the human race you seem to be."

Did I mention the seventh grade?

Posted by: Bill Otis | Mar 10, 2014 11:41:10 PM

Honestly, you keep repeating the same biased drivel in post after post. Is this an early sign that Alzheimer’s is setting in or have you only reached the Depends stage so far?

Posted by: Brad Vance | Mar 11, 2014 6:25:58 PM

Brad Vance --

Since you didn't answer, I'll repeat the questions.

Where's your evidence that these criminals were "contributing members of society" to start with? Or that they have any desire to contribute to anyone but themselves?

Posted by: Bill Otis | Mar 11, 2014 7:42:33 PM

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