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April 21, 2016

The latest news about the faltering state of federal statutory sentencing reform

This extended Politico article reports on the state and possible fate of federal statutory sentencing reform in Congress.  The piece is headlined "Time running out for major criminal justice bill; A last-ditch effort is underway to salvage a rare alliance between GOP senators and the White House."  Here is how it starts:

Time is running out to reboot efforts to reform the nation’s criminal justice laws, and supporters of reform are making a last-ditch attempt to enlist vulnerable Senate Republicans in an effort that’s probably one of the few chances to enact major bipartisan legislation during the election year.

The chief Republican backers, led by Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa and Majority Whip John Cornyn of Texas, have quietly courted key GOP senators for weeks to show Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) they could produce sweeping support for the bill, which would relax some mandatory minimum sentences for nonviolent offenders.  They also want to show they can move the bill relatively quickly on the Senate floor.

Though the bill has languished since it passed the Judiciary Committee in October, its authors have made revisions to satisfy criticisms from some tough-on-crime conservatives that the legislation would prematurely release violent criminals.  Those changes may be winning over some new Republicans.  “We’re taking a real close look at it this week,” said Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wis.), who is locked in one of the most competitive races this cycle.  “I’m very sympathetic with the bill.”

Yet, the bill’s sponsors have hinted at a formal rollout for weeks, with no official announcement.  Aides said the delay is to buy more time to build support, and they’re targeting Republicans up for reelection this year or senators who haven’t already leveled pointed criticism at the bill, such as Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.).

But time is running short, and other issues are competing for what’s left of it.  The Senate is preparing to restart the moribund appropriations process.  And after the Republican National Convention in July, the chamber will be largely out of commission until the lame-duck session in November and December.

Supporters acknowledge they need to prove to McConnell that there are 60 votes for the measure before the majority leader hauls a bill onto the floor that will cleave the Republican Conference.  “We have a lot of progress made and people saying that we’ve gone in the right direction.  But we’re not getting answers from some people,” Grassley said in a brief interview Wednesday.  “Like for instance, one senator says, ‘I’ll let you know Monday.’ He hasn’t let us know.”

April 21, 2016 at 09:39 PM | Permalink


I believe its been watered down to the point thats no longer matters.

Lets dump it and get a fresh start when these premadonnas arent trying look tough for re election.

Posted by: MidWestGuy | Apr 22, 2016 7:45:43 AM


Posted by: Fat Bastard | Apr 22, 2016 10:38:52 AM

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