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April 23, 2016

"The Prison Reformer Who Champions Ted Cruz"

The title of this post is the headline of this notable new Ozy article about a notable supporter of Senator Ted Cruz, who also has played a bit role in sentencing reform in Maryland.  Here is how it starts:

Michael Hough’s statehouse digs are filled with awards — from the American Conservative Union here, the Leadership Institute there.  You can’t miss the gold-framed Declaration of Independence, the old George W. Bush campaign sign or the NRA logo carpet outside the state senator’s office.  The photo of him and Ted Cruz glad-handing isn’t shocking, either, since Hough’s leading the presidential candidate’s primary efforts here in Maryland.  What’s more surprising: the picture next to it — of Hough and his wife, posing with another White House hopeful.  “My wife likes Donald,” the father of three says, painfully.

What’s a state campaign chairman to do?  Hough’s received high praise as “a respected conservative leader” from Cruz himself, though the 36-year-old lawmaker faces not just a divided home, but a divided state — one that could go the way of his wife if polls hold true during Maryland’s primary on Tuesday. It’s just one of many apparent contradictions. Bespectacled with a slick, Cruz-ian comb-over, Hough today looks nothing like the long-haired rock star of his garage-band days. He’s an Air Force vet who never served outside Wyoming.  And while he plays the part of a bona fide guns-and-faith conservative well, Hough’s most significant work is in … compassionate prison reform?

The Justice Reinvestment Act — which eases sentencing laws for nonviolent drug offenders and pushes offenders to treatment rather than prison — passed into law this month, in no small part thanks to Hough, who led the Republican efforts to craft it.  He’s also helped push through bills limiting civil asset forfeiture (“You had the ACLU and the prosecutors support it, which never happens,” he brags) and reforming police conduct and accountability — without being “antipolice,” Hough claims.  Popping open a Diet Coke, at just past 8 a.m., Hough calls the justice act the largest reform “in a generation” — and some experts agree it’s a doozy.

Yet, not everyone’s happy: “The Senate amended the life out of it,” the Maryland Alliance for Justice Reform’s Pat Schenck tells OZY.  It’s something to build off of and “a once-in-a-lifetime bill,” says Keith Wallington of the Justice Policy Institute, if only because “Maryland has (historically) set the bar pretty low for justice reform.” And while an early proposal included a reduction in prisons and budget savings nearing $250 million over 10 years, the Senate version went down to “a paltry” $34 million, Wallington says. “That’s a little overblown,” Hough counters, though he agrees the budget savings in the final bill will be less than originally projected.

At first blush, this stalwart Republican seems like an unlikely advocate for addicts and rampant recidivists.  But while GOPers such as Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan birthed and expanded the war on drugs decades ago, red state leaders from Texas to Utah and Georgia have recently championed justice reform due to both compassionate conservatism and a response to “draconian laws” that proved costly yet rarely improved public safety, says Lauren Krisai with the Reason Foundation, a libertarian think tank.  As a teen growing up with an alcoholic father, Hough knew the tug and pull of crime and addiction — the Nirvana fan got through those years fixing cars, dying his hair blond and red, and ignoring school to the tune of a 2.0 GPA — but as an adult he became an expert in addressing those problems.  “We over-criminalize everything,” says Hough, whose non-legislature job is as a senior policy adviser on criminal justice for the Faith & Freedom Coalition.  “This is where my Christianity and libertarianism come together.”

April 23, 2016 at 02:10 PM | Permalink

Comments

Little bit by little bit, the guidelines will get chopped down.

Realistically thats about all one can hope for. If we could get the mandatorys reduced significantly, that would be a huge accomplishment. You can have all the data and support, but there are so many that dont undersrand the federal system.

Maybe thats what need to be done. Take about 10 cases that are category 6 and have 2-4 enhancements, so they can see how everthing is additive in nature.

Then take some Acca cases and of coarse mandatory minimums and toss in a few 3 strikes for life due to drugs.

Maybe if these people see how the guidelines (senators and congress) they will get a better understanding and win over some key people. These are all smart educated people, so provideing them will something they can take with them, should be helpful.

The days of pressure and rants do zero, but everyones efforts are making a difference.

Posted by: MidWestGuy | Apr 23, 2016 9:42:17 PM

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