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December 6, 2016

"The Link Between Race and Solitary Confinement: Men of color are overrepresented in isolation, while whites are typically underrepresented."

The title of this post is the full headline of this new Atlantic piece.  Here is how it gets started (with links from the original):

Stark disparities in prisoners’ treatment are embedded into criminal-justice systems at the city, county, state, and federal levels, and have disproportionate, negative effects on men of color. A new analysis from the Association of State Correctional Administrators and Yale Law School provides a fresh trove of information with which to explore the racial dynamics in state and federal prisons — specifically through their findings on solitary confinement.

“People of color are overrepresented in solitary confinement compared to the general prison population,” said Judith Resnik, a professor at Yale Law School and one of the study’s authors. “In theory, if race wasn’t a variable, you wouldn’t see that kind of variation. You worry. It gives you a cause to worry.”

The study concluded that, overall, black male prisoners made up 40 percent of the total prison population in those 43 jurisdictions, but constituted 45 percent of the “restricted housing population,” another way to describe those in solitary confinement.  In 31 of the 43, the percentage of black men who spent time in solitary wasn’t proportional to their slice of the general population — it was greater.  Latinos were also disproportionately represented in solitary: On the whole, 21 percent of inmates in confinement were Latino, even though this group constituted only 20 percent of the total population.  Overall, in 22 of the 43 jurisdictions, Latinos were overrepresented in relation to their general-population numbers.

The numbers look slightly different at the state level. In some states, the racial makeup of prisons and their solitary-confinement populations appeared more balanced — like in Kentucky, where white prisoners made up 70 percent of both the general and restricted-housing populations. Black prisoners represented 28 percent of those imprisoned and 27 percent of those in solitary. The dynamic is similar in the District of Columbia, with whites representing 2 percent of both the general and solitary-confinement populations, and blacks representing 90 percent and 94 percent of those groups, respectively.

By and large, similarly aligned figures can be found throughout the country. But in some states, the racial disproportions are startling.  

For example, in a handful of states where Latinos represent a large swath of the overall population, the racial disparities are significant. In California, Latinos made up 42 percent of the general prison population, but 86 percent of those in solitary confinement. Whites, by contrast, were 22 percent of the general population, but only nine percent of those in solitary. And in Texas, Latinos made up 50 percent of those in solitary, but only 34 percent of the overall prison population. Yet again, whites’ figures were lower: They represented 32 percent of the general prison population, but 25 percent of the population in solitary confinement. Mississippi, too, had dissimilar numbers among the racial groups.

December 6, 2016 at 10:32 AM | Permalink

Comments

During my 8 years in Federal prisons, I spent about 3 years in THE HOLE (technically not solitary confinement because there are 2 men locked down 23+ hours per day in an 6' x 12' cell), usually for helping other inmates with their legal work (which is supposed to be permitted under BOP policy and U.S. Supreme court decisions) or insolence to staff (saying anything the staff doesn't like or agree with)! I once spent 6 months in THE HOLE "under investigation", after I typed 14 habeas corpus petitions (which were filed in the Eastern District of Kentucky), which resulted in the release of 14 Mariel Cuban INS detainees (held in Federal prisons without any Federal criminal convictions), soon after the Sixth Circuit rendered its En Banc decision in Rosales-Garcia v. Holland in 2003. At least in Federal prisons, The Hole is dramatically over-used. The BOP operates at about 170% of its design capacity, so beds in THE HOLE must be kept filled, since there are not enough beds for all of the inmates on the compounds of their prisons outside THE HOLE.

Posted by: Jim Gormley | Dec 6, 2016 10:45:05 AM

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