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April 20, 2017

Brennan Center releases report on "Criminal Justice in President Trump's First 100 Days"

The Brennan Center for Justice has released this big new report titled "Criminal Justice in President Trump's First 100 Days." Here is part of its "Executive Summary":

In his Inaugural Address, President Donald Trump pledged to address the rising specter of “American carnage” — “the crime and gangs and drugs that have stolen too many lives and robbed our country of so much unrealized potential.”  The last time a president addressed rising crime in his inaugural address was 1997.  Then, with crime near historic peaks (at 4,891 offenses per 100,000 people), President Bill Clinton spoke of the need to “help reclaim our streets from drugs and gangs and crime” so that “our streets will echo again with the laughter of our children, because no one will try to shoot them or sell them drugs anymore.”

Trump’s dark portrait of America, however, comes at a time when the national crime rate is near historic lows — 42 percent below what it was in 1997. As his first 100 days near an end, what has the president done to address crime and criminal justice? And what can the country expect in the weeks and months ahead?

So far, many of the administration’s actions are symbolic.  But they evidence a clear return to the discredited “tough on crime” rhetoric of the 1990s, and suggest a significant departure from the Obama administration’s approach to criminal justice.  Trump’s turn also directly contradicts the emerging consensus among conservatives, progressives, law enforcement, and researchers that the country’s incarceration rate is too high, and that our over-reliance on prison is not the best way to address crime.  As crime remains near historic lows — despite local, isolated increases — these proposed changes are, ultimately, solutions in search of a problem. Taken to an extreme, they would set back the national trans-partisan movement to end mass incarceration.

This analysis documents the following key shifts in federal policy since January 20th:

Misguided Fears of a New Crime Wave....

A New War on Drugs?...

Increased Immigration Enforcement and Detention....

Decreased Oversight of Local Police....

Increased Use of Private Prisons....

Possible Federal Sentencing or Reentry Legislation....

April 20, 2017 at 10:19 AM | Permalink

Comments

Brennan Center. Soros funded left wing propaganda trash. I am not going to bother to rebut these hate filled proc-criminal assholes. It would be as useful as arguing with David Duke about black people or Jews. This is just lying trash.

Posted by: David Behar | Apr 20, 2017 5:08:01 PM

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