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May 27, 2017

"What will happen to Pennsylvania's death penalty?"

The title of this post is the headline of this lengthy local article. Here are excerpts:

Five times a year, Pennsylvania corrections officials meet inside a white block masonry field house on the grounds of the prison near Penn State, and carry out a mock execution. They escort the “inmate” to the execution chamber. They strap that person onto the gurney. And then they simulate injecting a lethal dose of drugs into his body.

They perform this drill even though capital punishment in the commonwealth remains indefinitely on hold while government officials await a report, now years in the making, analyzing capital punishment’s history, effectiveness and cost in Pennsylvania.

The death sentence imposed last month on Eric Frein, the Poconos survivalist who killed a State Police trooper and injured another in September 2014, has reignited questions – and in some cases, criticism – about why the state has taken so long to decide whether to continue or stop, once and for all, executing criminals....

And state Sen. Scott Wagner, a York County Republican hoping to unseat the governor next year, has signaled it’s an issue he’ll press on the campaign trail. “I can assure you, when I’m governor, within the first 48 hours, I’ll be up there reversing that moratorium,” Wagner said in an interview Friday....

In Pennsylvania, ... Wolf, a Democrat, [imposed] a moratorium on the death penalty after taking office in early 2015. He argued the state should await the results of a long-awaited report by the Pennsylvania Task Force and Advisory Committee on Capital Punishment before putting any more criminals to death. The report is expected to analyze more than a dozen factors involving the death penalty, such as cost, bias and effectiveness.

Wolf’s decision has drawn backlash from organizations like the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association, which in 2015 called it “a misuse of [the governor’s] power” that ignores the law. The study itself has also come under fire, particularly for how long it’s taking to complete: It was ordered up by the state Senate in 2011 and was supposed to be completed by 2013....

Meanwhile, tax dollars still go toward keeping prisoners on death row. Each of the state’s 165 death row inmates — from Frein, who was sentenced last month, to Henry Fahy, who has been awaiting his punishment since November 1983 — cost Pennsylvania $10,000 more a year to house than a convict sentenced to life in prison. This does not account for the additional legal fees associated with capital cases: Some estimate prosecuting and litigating a capital murder case can cost up to $3 million more than a non-capital murder case....

“We have spent billions of dollars having a death penalty – including maintaining a death facility – and we have not executed someone who did not ask to be executed” since 1962, Sen. Daylin Leach, a Montgomery County Democrat and one of four members of a Senate task force awaiting the report, said last week. Leach is an unapologetic opponent of the death penalty. He has introduced bills to abolish it since 2009, arguing that it is “immoral and barbaric,” and calling the cost of capital punishment “troubling” – including the cost of maintaining the execution complex.

May 27, 2017 at 11:41 PM | Permalink

Comments

It needs to go European.

Posted by: David Behar | May 28, 2017 10:55:32 AM

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