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June 20, 2017

AG Sessions announces notable new DOJ crime-fighting plans to be rolled out in a dozen cities

NPSP200Today marks the start of the Justice Department's National Summit on Crime Reduction and Public Safety, and this summit is already producing some interesting news.  This Washington Examiner article, headlined "Jeff Sessions announces plan to help 12 cities find ways to fight crime," provides these basics:

Attorney General Jeff Sessions on Tuesday announced a new initiative to combat violence and bolster public safety by promising federal resources to help 12 cities strategize on the best ways to fight crime.  The new federal effort came ahead of Sessions' speech at the opening of the National Summit on Crime Reduction and Public Safety outside of Washington.

"Turning back the recent troubling increase of violent crime in our country is a top priority of the Department of Justice and the Trump Administration, as we work to fulfill the president's promise to make America safe again," Sessions said in a statement.

The initiative will start with 12 cities joining the Justice Department's newly formed National Public Safety Partnership, dubbed "PSP."  The new PSP program comes on the heels of President Trump's February executive order on public safety.  According to the Justice Department, the initial 12 cities are that ones need "significant assistance" in combating "gun crime, drug trafficking and gang violence."

The Department of Justice will work with American cities suffering from serious violent crime problems.  Our new National Public Safety Partnership program will help these communities build up their own capacity to fight crime, by making use of data-driven, evidence-based strategies tailored to specific local concerns, and by drawing upon the expertise and resources of our department," Sessions said.

The 12 cities are:

  • Birmingham, Ala.
  • Indianapolis, Ind.
  • Memphis, Tenn.
  • Toledo, Ohio
  • Baton Rouge, La.
  • Buffalo, N.Y.
  • Cincinnati, Ohio
  • Houston, Texas
  • Jackson, Tenn.
  • Kansas City, Mo.
  • Lansing, Mich.
  • Springfield, Ill.

More cities are expected to be announced in the coming months, the Justice Department said.

Notably missing from the list are Chicago and Baltimore, two cities that have been rocked by gun violence and homicides this year.

AG Sessions also gave this lengthy speech to open the National Summit on Crime Reduction and Public Safety, and that speech included both a short discussion of his recent charging/sentencing memo and this new initiative:

[L]ast month I issued a memo to all federal prosecutors establishing a new charging policy. This policy makes clear that Department prosecutors generally will charge the most serious, readily provable offenses supported by the facts of the case. Instead of barring prosecutors from faithfully enforcing the law, this charging policy empowers these trusted professionals to apply the law fairly — and allows them to use discretion where a strict application of the law would result in an injustice.

That is how good law enforcement has always worked. This policy ensures that we uphold our constitutional duty to faithfully execute the laws, our ethical duty of candor to the courts, and our obligation to the American people to ensure that justice is done.

And today, the Justice Department is taking another important step, by launching a new program called the National Public Safety Partnership, or PSP.  This program will help communities suffering from serious violent crime problems to build up their capacity to fight crime.  The PSP program will use data-driven, evidence-based strategies, and draw upon the expertise of people in the Department of Justice, as well as others.

Our Department’s components will also support the PSP, working in collaboration with our local partners.  This program will enhance our support of state, local, and tribal law enforcement, so we can more effectively investigate and prosecute violent criminals — especially those involved in gun crimes, drug trafficking, and gang violence.

Based on local needs, the PSP program will provide two complementary but separate tiers of help — Diagnostics Teams and Operations Teams.  Diagnostic Teams will assess the local factors driving increased violent crime, and will help local leaders develop strategies to address those factors, over a period of up to 18 months.  Operations Teams will provide rigorous training and coaching over a three-year period.  They will help communities form a lasting coordination structure among federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies and prosecutors.  Among other things, Operations Teams will provide enhanced crime trend analysis and comprehensive gun-crime intelligence programs.

We have selected 12 initial cities to take part in the Public Safety Partnership program, along with the 10 cities who took part in a pilot concept known as the Violence Reduction Network.  We anticipate announcing more PSP sites later this year.

And the new National Public Safety Partnership has this slick new website.

June 20, 2017 at 11:19 AM | Permalink

Comments

"Notably missing from the list are Chicago and Baltimore, two cities that have been rocked by gun violence and homicides this year."

*clueless look* is that a problem?

Posted by: Joe | Jun 20, 2017 12:04:49 PM

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