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June 1, 2017

Can football stars help get Ohio criminal justice reform over the goal line?

I am fond of stressing to students in my sentencing classes that a wide array of actors are involved in the development and application of sentencing law and policy.  And now this new local article, which prompts the question in the title of this post, will allow me to highlight in future classes that even famous football players can sometimes get in on the sentencing action.  Here are the basic details (with links from the original):

Three former Ohio State football players and one Cleveland Browns player are among those imploring the Ohio Senate to embrace a plan that will keep low-level offenders out of prison.  Former Buckeyes Malcolm Jenkins, Raekwon McMillan and Chris "Beanie" Wells have signed a letter to Ohio senators in support of the Targeted Community Alternatives to Prison plan.  So, too, has Ibraheim Campbell, a defensive back at Northwestern University who was drafted by the Cleveland Browns in the fourth round of the 2015 NFL draft.

"As NFL players who have personal connections to our broken justice system and have seen its impact on our own neighborhoods, we support justice reforms that strengthen families and restore communities," begins the letter.

The TCAP reforms, which are included in Gov. John Kasich's budget proposal, include eliminating mandatory prison sentences for minor parole violations and transferring low-level, non-violent to local jails or to drug treatment programs or other community-based alternatives.  A House of Representatives version of the budget includes significantly less money than what Kasich wants for TCAP reforms, said Holly Harris, executive director of the U.S. Justice Action Network....

She said the football players who signed the letter are not being paid. "They simply care about their communities," Harris said.

Campbell said during an interview with cleveland.com that he's had family members who have been subjected to injustices in the legal system and that reform is "something that I'm passionate about."

The governor's plan would mean an estimated 3,400 offenders a year would be jailed or supervised locally instead of being sent to prison. The House version would divert only 2,100 offenders, Harris said.

Not everyone supports the plan. John Murphy, executive director of the Ohio Prosecuting Attorneys Association, said the plan would limit sentencing options. The County Commissioners Association of Ohio believes the plan has merit, but is concerned about the cost to counties and the timeline for the change.

The Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections has instituted pilot TCAP programs in eight counties - Clinton, Ross,, Medina, Lucas, Defiance, Henry, Williams and Fulton counties.

June 1, 2017 at 11:58 PM | Permalink

Comments

Low level offenders are being kept out of prison, already.

I strongly urge those football players, give us your home address. We need to send the thousands of diverted criminals to live in halfway houses on your street. If you refuse to provide this information, shut the fuck up, you know nothing, pro-criminal morons. The same goes for all the pro-criminal lawyers here, the lawyers in the legislature, the filthy subhumans on the appellate bench. The home address or shut the fuck up, you amoral mortal enemies of crime victims.

Posted by: David Behar | Jun 2, 2017 12:34:55 AM

Good job catching a big time terrorist.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/woman-82-arrested-after-scuffle-with-tsa-officer-at-wichita-kansas-airport/ar-BBBPgsl?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=ientp

Posted by: David Behar | Jun 2, 2017 11:11:09 AM

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