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June 28, 2017

Two very different (but perhaps similar) tales of prison sentencing from outpost Virginia in incarceration nation

I generally do not blog all that often or that much about individual sentencing cases unless they involve high-profile defendants or high-profile issues or result in high-profile rulings.  But this afternoon I just happen to come across two notable local sentencing stories back-to-back from the same local Virginia paper that for me highlighted the enduring tendency in the United States to use imprisonment, and then more imprisonment, in response to any and every social and legal problem.  Here are the headlines and essentials that caught my eye:

"JMU student gets jail time for registering dead people"

A 21-year-old man who pleaded guilty last week to filing 18 phony voter registration applications in Harrisonburg will spend 100 to 120 days in prison, according to federal prosecutors in the Western District of Virginia.

Andrew J. Spieles of Harrisonburg admitted to filing the fraudulent registrations in August while working with Democratic-affiliated groups as a student at James Madison University ahead of the 2016 presidential election. The fraud was discovered after local election officials noticed that some applications had been filed in the names of dead people, including the father of a Rockingham County judge.

The offense was punishable by a fine of up to $100,000 and up to a year in prison. Spieles told investigators that he fabricated the applications to help a co-worker hit a registration “quota,” according to court documents. There is no indication any fraudulent votes were cast in November’s election as a result of the improper registrations.

"Jury recommends 65-year sentence for Charlottesville heroin dealer"

A Henrico County jury has called for a 65-year sentence for a man convicted of purchasing heroin at Short Pump parking lots so the drugs could be resold in Charlottesville, where the defendant lived.  The jury recommended that decades-long sentence for Norell Sterling Ward, 46, last week after convicting him on a count of conspiracy to distribute heroin and on two counts of possessing heroin with the intent to distribute, said Matthew C. Ackley, a deputy Henrico commonwealth’s attorney.

Attorneys in the case could not say whether a 65-year term, if enacted, would set any type of record punishment for this type of crime, but all agreed it would represent a significant sentence. “I can tell you that this is a high sentence and likely reflective of the community awareness of the heroin problem in Henrico,” Ackley said.

Ward was identified as a midlevel heroin distributor who would travel from Charlottesville to Short Pump to buy heroin in parking lots so the drugs could be distributed back in Charlottesville, Ackley said. The prosecutor said it’s estimated Ward distributed 4 to 6 kilograms of heroin over a roughly 18-month period. The defendant would purchase the drugs from parking lots at Short Pump-area businesses including McDonald’s, Whole Foods, Target and 7-Eleven, Ackley said.

Henrico Circuit Judge Richard S. Wallerstein Jr. will now weigh whether to follow through on the jury’s recommendation and impose the full 65 years at a September sentencing....

Ackley said Ward bought his heroin from a drug organization run by Shawn Lamont Bailey, a 46-year-old Henrico man who pleaded guilty in January to two felony counts of distributing heroin near his West Broad Village home. Bailey is to be sentenced next month. Under a plea deal, Bailey agreed to plead guilty in return for spending between 8 to 10 years in prison.

Ward, who is going to be formally sentenced on Sept. 13, has a criminal history that includes convictions for two burglaries as well as a conviction for possessing heroin, Ackley said.

June 28, 2017 at 04:55 PM | Permalink

Comments

Only 65 years? This jury was soft on crime.

Posted by: anon1 | Jun 29, 2017 6:06:00 AM

I suspect it's not a record given jury sentencing and a maximum of life. The only way it would be is if no one risked it before.

Posted by: Erik M | Jun 29, 2017 11:51:38 AM

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