« Pennsylvania Supreme Court issues major Miller ruling declaring presumption against the imposition of LWOP on juvenile killers | Main | SCOTUSblog begins symposium on OT 2016 death penalty decisions »

June 27, 2017

"Will Trump Use Science to Fight Crime?"

The question in the title of this post is the headline of this notable new piece by Ted Gest at The Crime Report, which reports on what some criminologists had to say at a recent event about crime fighting in the Trump Administration.  Here are excerpts:

Leading criminologists expressed cautious optimism yesterday that President Trump will embrace evidence-based practices in his administration’s war on crime.

Laurie Robinson, who advocated the use of science in justice as an Assistant Attorney General in the Obama administration, declared, “I do not think the [criminal justice] field is turning back” on evidence-based programs. Robinson, now a member of the criminology faculty at George Mason University, said that officials “on the front line have to know what works, and how to pay for it.” She noted that bipartisan justice reform plans had been approved in recent years in such conservative states as Georgia, Louisiana and North Dakota.

Her comments came at the annual gathering sponsored by the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy at the George Mason campus, in northern Virginia near Washington, D.C.. The session opened with a discussion on the “Progress of Evidence-Based Crime Policy in the Last Three Decades.”

Some critics have expressed doubt that the new administration will base policies on scientific evidence, noting Trump’s professed disbelief in global warming and Attorney General Jeff Sessions’ advocacy of tough-on-crime practices that studies have found ineffective....

Denise O’Donnell, who headed the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Assistance under Obama, said many U.S. policing leaders have concluded that “there is power in data.” She cited such developments as the use of public opinion surveys by police departments in formulating policies on officers’ body-worn cameras.

James Burch, a vice president of the Washington, D.C.-based Police Foundation and a former Justice Department official, offered a “qualified yes” to the question of whether evidence-based criminal justice practices will continue under Trump. Burch said he detected a “different tone” in discussions among police chiefs and sheriffs at national conventions in recent years. Law enforcement officials are asking themselves “how do we hold ourselves accountable?” he said....

Speakers pointed out that in opening a national “summit” on crime reduction and public safety last week, Sessions said that in a new national “Public Safety Partnership” involving 12 localities, the Justice Department will provide “diagnostic teams” to “assess the local factors driving increased violent crime, and will help local leaders develop strategies to address those factors.”

June 27, 2017 at 07:21 PM | Permalink

Comments

Trump shoots from the hip furst then engages the brain, sometimes.

He mau own lots if expensive buildings, but he had minimal invilement with the design, and implementation.

In short, he was born with a golden spoon and wants his name to replace everything that Obama has done. His crime direction pretty much says it all.

But, he still us the Pres of the USA.

Posted by: MidWestGuy | Jun 27, 2017 10:06:53 PM

Science project.

CRISPR/cas 9 technology to eliminate antisocial personality disorder or its components.

Surveillance cameras may be a factor in driving crime indoors to internet crime. There were 15 million internet crimes, estimated, each year.

Posted by: David Behar | Jun 28, 2017 9:26:36 AM

Post a comment

In the body of your email, please indicate if you are a professor, student, prosecutor, defense attorney, etc. so I can gain a sense of who is reading my blog. Thank you, DAB