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July 9, 2017

"Death Row Dogs, Hard Time Prisoners, and Creative Rehabilitation Strategies: Prisoner-Dog Training Programs"

The title of this post is the title of this recently published article authored by Paul Larkin. Here is the abstract:

More and more prisons have witnessed the success of Prisoner-Dog Training Programs (PDPs) in the last few years.  PDPs entail a prisoner training an animal (usually a dog) to be a service animal for the disabled or a well-behaved household pet.  PDPs at state and federal prisons have turned out to be a win-win-win.  The animals involved in the program are typically those at risk of being euthanized, giving those animals a second chance at life; the community benefits because people adopt well-behaved and trained animals; and the prisoner-trainers learn what it means to contribute to society in a material way, to develop emotional connections, and to care for others.  At first glance, these programs seem perfect—which begs the question: Why are they not in every prison?

This article examines PDPs and the success of those programs in the case studies that have been conducted.  The Article suggests that in order for more successful PDPs to be launched, more data needs to be collected.  In analyzing PDPs, this Article looks at the history of criminal punishment through the lens of rehabilitation versus retribution, then proceeds to an overview of PDPs and their promising initial data.  Finally, this Article discusses the need for further examination of PDPs and their effectiveness, as well as possible mechanisms that could be used to expand their uses. Ultimately, this Article encourages the Department of Justice and Congress to lend greater support to PDPs in federal and state prisons. 

July 9, 2017 at 09:48 PM | Permalink

Comments

This article inspires some questions.

1) Animal cruelty is a hallmark trait of antisocial personality. What happens if an animal frustrates one of the prisoners?

2) Professional dogs such as seeing eye dogs, and bomb, cadaver, or drug sniffing dogs are worth $10,000. They can also be trained to detect bed bugs, cancer, pending death. Does this program allow for high value training? If it does, do any of the high prices paid go back to the prisoner trainers?

3) Is anyone afraid a prisoner will secretly train a dog to kill the police or guards?

4) It is well known dogs are racist. If a dog rejects a black prisoner, will this dog be sanctioned by being expelled?

5) I am sorry. Forget $10,000. "the TSA pays $218,000 in startup training costs for explosive sniffing dogs and then pays $158,000 each year after that. This money covers the salary of the dog handler, the dog’s food, veterinary costs, kenneling, training, and certification." Add this job to the list of missed opportunities by Prisoner Industries. I am sick of those dummies.

Posted by: David Behar | Jul 9, 2017 11:21:24 PM

Why are dogs so racist? Some answers here:

http://gawker.com/5972557/why-are-dogs-racist-canine-experts-speak

So any prisoner dog training must be politically correct, and take the inner Klan out of the dog.

Posted by: David Behar | Jul 10, 2017 2:33:22 PM

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