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July 10, 2017

Drug Policy Alliance issues big new report calling for drug decriminalization

Download (2)This new press release reports on the latest call by the Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) for drug decriminalization in the US.  The DPA has this new report titled "It's Time for the U.S. to Decriminalize Drug Use and Possession," and the press release discusses its work with other organization to push this agenda forward.  Here is start and end of the DPA report's executive summary:

By any measure and every metric, the U.S. war on drugs — a constellation of laws and policies that seeks to prevent and control the use and sale of drugs primarily through punishment and coercion – has been a colossal failure with tragic results. Indeed, federal and state policies that are designed to be “tough” on people who use and sell drugs have helped over-fill our jails and prisons, permanently branded millions of people as “criminals”, and exacerbated drug-related death, disease and suffering — all while failing at their stated goal of reducing problematic drug use.

This report offers a roadmap for how to begin to unwind our failed drug war. It focuses on one practical step that can and should be taken to avoid many of the harms that flow from punitive prohibitionist drug laws and to promote proven, effective health-based interventions.

Drug decriminalization is a critical next step toward achieving a rational drug policy that puts science and public health before punishment and incarceration.  Decades of evidence has clearly demonstrated that decriminalization is a sensible path forward that would reap vast human and fiscal benefits, while protecting families and communities.

Drug decriminalization is defined here as the elimination of criminal penalties for drug use and possession, as well as the elimination of criminal penalties for the possession of equipment used for the purpose of introducing drugs into the human body, such as syringes.  Throughout this report, we will use the phrase “drug possession” to include drug possession, drug use, and possession of paraphernalia used for the purpose of introducing drugs into the human body.

Ideally, drug decriminalization entails the elimination of all punitive, abstinence-based, coercive approaches to drug use; however, for purposes of this report, the term encompasses a spectrum of efforts to eliminate criminal penalties, even if such efforts do not eliminate all forms of coercion entirely.  Drug decriminalization also ideally entails the removal of criminal penalties for low-level sales, given that the line between seller and user is often blurred (this subject and the broader issue of people who sell drugs will be addressed in a subsequent DPA report).

This report is the product of a comprehensive review of the public health and criminology literature, an analysis of drug policies in the U.S. and abroad, and input from experts in the fields of drug policy and criminal justice.  By highlighting the benefits of eliminating criminal penalties for drug use and possession, we seek to provide policymakers, community leaders and advocates with evidence-based options for a new approach....

This report makes the following recommendations for local, state and federal policymakers in the U.S.:

• Congress and U.S. states should eliminate federal and state criminal penalties and collateral sanctions for drug use, drug possession for personal use, and possession of paraphernalia intended for consuming drugs.

• Congress should amend federal law to de-schedule marijuana and remove it from the federal Controlled Substances Act.

• Administrative penalties – such as civil asset forfeiture, administrative detention, driver’s license suspension (absent impairment), excessive fines, and parental termination or child welfare interventions (absent harm to children) – run counter to the intent of a decriminalization policy and should not be imposed.

• Decriminalization policies — like other drug policies — generally function far more effectively when accompanied by robust and diverse harm reduction and treatment-on-demand programs, including medication-assisted treatment.

• Local and state governments should adopt pre-booking diversion and 911 Good Samaritan policies to prioritize public health over punishment and incarceration.

July 10, 2017 at 06:39 PM | Permalink

Comments

Meanwhile:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/the-essential-role-of-medicaid-and-criminal-justice_us_5962566ee4b0cf3c8e8d5984

Medicaid and Medicaid expansion would therefore be an aspect of criminal justice, including when factoring in what specific policies and policy actors has accomplished.

Posted by: Joe | Jul 10, 2017 9:04:37 PM

Anyone advocating for criminalization of drugs, must logically support the prohibition of alcohol. That is the most toxic substance, physically, second to tobacco, and the most behaviorally toxic substance of all.

Posted by: David Behar | Jul 10, 2017 10:30:35 PM

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