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November 20, 2017

Anyone eager to draw sentencing lessons in the wake of mass murderer Charlie Manson's demise?

There are any number of old and new California sentencing stories that surround the murderous Manson family, especially as some members of the "family" continue to pursue parole.  With the death of the leader, this extended Daily Beast article, headlined "Charles Manson’s Prosecutor Says He Deserved to Be Killed Years Ago," provides a useful reminder of the awful carnage and legacy of Manson.  Here are snippets with some of the enduring sentencing details:

Charles Manson should have died a long time before today. That’s according to one of the prosecutors who sent Manson and his murderous followers to Death Row, only to see their sentences later commuted to life in prison.

Manson, 83, died Sunday at Kern County hospital in California, corrections officials said. Manson’s death spells “the end of a very evil man,” Stephen R. Kay told The Daily Beast in an exclusive interview earlier this year prior to Manson’s death.

Kay was a Los Angeles County deputy district attorney who worked with fellow deputy Vincent Bugliosi to secure guilty verdicts for Manson and his flock of killers, who came to be known as “The Family.” Manson, Susan Atkins, Leslie Van Houten, Patricia Krenwinkel, Charles “Tex” Watson, Steve “Clem” Grogan, and Bruce Davis were convicted in all or some of the 1969 murders of nine people, including actress Sharon Tate, who was pregnant with director Roman Polanski’s child.

“No, that was a pretty easy decision based on the gruesomeness of the crimes and the motives: wanting to start a race war,” Kay said. “I think there are some crimes that are so heinous that in order for us to exist as a society that we have to say we will absolutely not accept this type of behavior and the person will have to suffer the ultimate penalty. “It’s not that we’re giving Charles Manson the death penalty; it’s that he earned it.”...

At 73, and now retired, Kay said he can still hear the sinister threats on his life made by Manson and his disciples. “Squeaky [Fromme] and Sandy Good snuck up behind me and said they’re going to do to my house what was done at the Tate house,” Kay said....  During one of Manson’s many parole hearings, the death-cult leader detailed how he was going to take out Kay. “The most direct one was after the parole hearing—he told me he was going to have me killed out in the parking lot on the way to my car,” he said. “I mean, that to me was the most memorable one. It was so direct.” Kay acknowledged even with protection, he was merely testing fate if he felt like he was immune to becoming another Manson victim. “When Manson says something like that after what he’s done, you have to take it seriously,” he said.

It’s the kind of power wielded by Manson that the former prosecutor feels was lorded over Fromme, who was caught with a pistol trying to shoot President Gerald Ford in 1975. “I happen to believe that there’s no way Squeaky Fromme on her own would have thought up the idea of trying to assassinate President Ford in the park in Sacramento,” he said. “I believe Manson put her up to that.”

In 1970, Manson, Atkins, Krenwinkel, and Watson (in a separate trial later) were convicted of murder and conspiracy for the Tate-LaBianca killings and were all sentenced to death.  Sealing their fates was fellow Family member Linda Kasabian, who testified against them in exchange for immunity.  In a 1971 trial, Manson was convicted and sentenced to life for the 1969 murders of Donald “Shorty” Shea and Gary Hinman. When Shea, who was a ranch hand and stuntman on Wild Western films returned to Spahn Ranch with a black wife, it allegedly set Manson off. Manson was also convinced that Shea had “snitched” on the group, having tipped off cops on a boosted car, which led to an Aug. 16, 1969, raid at dawn on their compound by police....

All of the Family members who were sentenced to death, including Manson, were spared when the California Supreme Court overturned the death penalty back in 1972 and commuted their sentences to life in prison. The state would later bring back the death penalty, but the life sentences for Manson and his killer kin stuck.  “It would be ex post facto violation of the Constitution to go back and reinstate it because you can only be prosecuted with what the law was when you committed the crime, and these laws were committed in 1969,” Kay said. “And the death penalty that was in effect in ’69 was held to be unconstitutional.”...

Ironically, most of Manson’s former followers have outlived him, save for Susan Atkins, who died in prison from brain cancer back in 2009.  Leslie Van Houten, now 68, held Rosemary Labianca down and covered her face with a pillowcase while another Family member carved “War” into her husband’s stomach after stabbing him in the couple’s home. (Then they helped themselves to chocolate milk in the fridge.)  Van Houten was also the one who scribbled missives on the house walls using their victims’ blood.  “I don’t let myself off the hook,” Van Houten told a parole panel. “I don’t find parts in any of this that makes me feel the slightest bit good about myself.”  Van Houten was granted parole in September, but Gov. Jerry Brown is expected to reverse the decision as he did last spring.

Charles “Tex” Watson, now 72, did a stint in Atascadero State Mental Hospital and said he has since found God while serving his life sentence as a chaplain at Mule Creek Prison in Ione. Watson failed more than a dozen times to convince a parole board to free him for his part in being Manson’s hitman; his was the last face so many victims saw before they were tortured and slain with a wrench, knife, or pistol.

Patricia “Krenny” Krenwinkel, 70, remains California’s oldest female inmate and has been serving life at California Institution for Women in Corona. She has since renounced Manson and The Family. “What a coward that I found myself to be when I look at the situation,” Krenwinkel said during a 2014 interview with The New York Times.  Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme, 61, was granted parole back in 2009 after serving 34 years hard time for the attempt on President Ford’s life. She has reportedly relocated to upstate New York, where she lives in isolation....

That Manson managed to hold on for this long was like an open wound for so many families. “It made the case go on forever,” Kay said. “If the penalty was put into effect then the case would have been done in the 1970s. There’s never really any closure.”...  Tate’s mother, who died in 1992, became an outspoken crusader for justice.  “I think at one time she was the most powerful woman for victims rights in California,” Kay said, adding that if you were a politician worth your salt in California you sought out Tate’s endorsement. “She really started the victims’ rights movement that is still so powerful even today.”

Kay isn’t blind to the irony that had the sentence gone forward Manson wouldn’t have become quite the diabolical deity that has haunted popular culture for decades.  “We wouldn’t be having this conversation,” Kay said.

November 20, 2017 at 10:43 AM | Permalink

Comments

Yes. Had Manson been executed at 14, and not protected, privileged and empowered by the lawyer profession, a whole lot of pain, cost, and tragedy would have been prevented. Thank the lawyer profession. It is 100% at fault for this manmade disaster.

Posted by: David Behar | Nov 20, 2017 11:03:59 AM

Perhaps being ☠️stillborn☠️ would have saved many substantial grief •

Or had his parents been totally asexual •

Posted by: Docile the Kind Soul | Nov 20, 2017 11:47:16 AM

Docile. No doubt, Manson put his family through hell from age 3. Preschool children accurately identify future criminals 30 years ahead of the lawyer, when asked whom they want to play with, and whom they want to avoid. It is not a mysterious ability. They want to avoid kids who hurt them, and who grab toys out of their hands. The crime meter is spinning at supersonic speed, from that age.

The DOJ should fund a study of the genetics of antisocial personality. It accounts for 50% of prisoners. It is one of the most validated of all psychiatric conditions, and even has a physical test, which no other psychiatric diagnosis does, the Cold Pressor Test. Its validation, as a syndrome, took place in the mid-19th Century, and its criteria have stood the test of time. Without any fancy diagnosis stuff, you could tell. Listen to Manson for 5 minutes, and the word, Nuts, comes to mind.

Posted by: David Behar | Nov 20, 2017 12:30:21 PM

Lesson No. 1. No viable death penalty in the USA, even for the worst of the worst, until you have executed appellate court judges, for insurrection against the constitution. To deter.

Posted by: David Behar | Nov 20, 2017 12:34:19 PM

DB is a nazist.

Posted by: Claudio Giusti | Nov 20, 2017 2:42:47 PM

Hi, Claudio. What makes you call me that bad name?

If Hitler had been executed in 1924, instead of coddled by the dirty lawyer traitors of Germany, for his attempted coup and treason, would history have been better or worse, in your opinion?

What if the US had summarily shot the prisoners, instead of coddling them under the threat of lawyers embedded among our warriors, cancelling lawful orders from 4 Star generals down to the squad level? These prisoners networked in cushy US prisons, conceived, and worked out the details of ISIS. Would the people of Iraq have been better off or worse off?

WWII. ISIS. 100% the fault of pro-criminal, lawyer traitors.

Posted by: David Behar | Nov 20, 2017 4:38:41 PM

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