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November 16, 2017

Notable crime fighting comments by Deputy AG Rosenstein in Chicago

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein delivered this lengthy speech at an awards dinner in Chicago on Thursday evening, and it included a number of interesting passages about crime fighting. I recommend the speech in full, and here are a few passages I thought especially worth highlighting:

In the first few decades after its creation in 1919, the Chicago Crime Commission battled bootleggers, gangs, and public corruption. It famously named Al Capone as Public Enemy Number One, which inspired the FBI to create its Ten Most Wanted List.

The challenges Chicago faces today demand a similar approach. In 2016, more than 4,300 Chicagoans were shot, and 760 were killed. On average, one person was shot every two hours, and two people were killed every day.  This year, with more than 600 homicides so far, Chicago is on track to report the second-highest murder total this century....

Gang violence accounts for the majority of the shootings and killings. Most of the violence relates to drug trafficking. Gang members do not just kill each other. T he also murder innocent bystanders -- men, women, and even children.

I mentioned earlier that I have a particular interest in a Chicago case from almost a century ago. It arose following the most notorious Chicago gang murder in history, known as the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre.  In 1929, seven victims were lined up against a wall and shot with machine guns.  The sensational crime shocked the city and provoked a public outcry to crack down on crime....

So Eliot Ness and his allies sent Capone to prison for a more readily provable crime -- tax evasion. Attorney General Robert Kennedy adopted a similar approach in 1961, when he counseled agents to fight organized crime with all available tools, even if it required prosecuting gangsters for minor offenses. In this century, after the attacks of September 11, 2001, Attorney General John Ashcroft ordered prosecutors to disrupt terrorist plots by pursuing any lawful charges to put suspects behind bars before they carry out their murderous plans.

The lesson of Ness, Kennedy and Ashcroft informs my approach to violent crime.  The lesson is that if we really want to save lives, we must have the courage to order our law enforcement agencies to employ proactive policing. To prevent crime, you need to identify killers and remove them from the community before they strike again.

I support education, job-training, rehabilitation, and other efforts to teach people not to commit crimes. But for police and prosecutors, our unique power is the ability to send people to prison.  The challenge is to focus on the right people and to make it count.  Local police agencies spend much of their time reacting to emergency calls and investigating past crimes, but they convict only a fraction of the perpetrators.

During my briefings with the leaders of the Chicago Police Department this morning, I learned that Chicago is now working to drive down violent crime through proactive policing.  We know that proactive policing works.  Proactive police and prosecutors identify violent repeat offenders, then they commit the resources needed to gather evidence of any readily prosecutable crimes.

Targeting dangerous repeat offenders for proactive enforcement is not a "zero tolerance" strategy of arresting random people for minor offenses.  It is a thoughtful strategy of identifying the career criminals and gangs that are fomenting violence in our communities, and using constitutional policing to arrest, prosecute and incarcerate them....

The lesson is that deterrence requires enforcement and rules that matter to criminals are the ones that carry expected penalties the criminals are unwilling to pay.  Deterrence is about fear of consequences. We want criminals to fear the police and the consequences of committing crimes.  If dangerous criminals are not afraid, then law-abiding citizens are in jeopardy.

When we see a surge in violent crime that follows a dramatic disruption in policing, as happened in Baltimore and Chicago, it is obvious that there is a lapse in the deterrent effect of law enforcement.  The debate about what caused the recent lapse in deterrence will endure, as will efforts to remedy root causes and improve relationships between police officers and residents of crime-ridden neighborhoods.

In the meantime, the crime surge can be suppressed if law enforcement agencies work together to secure lengthy sentences for armed felons, build proactive drug and conspiracy cases against members of gangs that foment violence, and prosecute dangerous offenders who violate probation or parole conditions.  I saw that approach work in Baltimore from 2007 to 2014. Both shootings and arrests fell dramatically.  It can work again....

Unfortunately, some people will not act good.  The national violent crime rate rose nearly seven percent over the past two years. The homicide rate increased more than 20 percent. Proactive policing can help reverse that trend....

The Attorney General also announced the creation of the National Public Safety Partnership to combat violent crime, and we hosted a National Summit on Crime Reduction and Public Safety.  The Attorney General established a new charging policy that authorizes prosecutors to charge defendants with the most serious offense.  It is not really a new policy; it is a return to the policy that worked when crime was falling....

We also are hiring additional federal prosecutors to focus on violent crime.  More police officers will patrol the streets with COPS hiring grants.  The Organized Crime and Drug Enforcement Task Forces helps implement a National Gang Strategy Initiative.  We offer training and technical assistance to state and local partners, and we collaborate with local law enforcement and exchange best practices.

There are many other things that we do to help reduce crime, but I want to conclude by talking about one of the most important.  We fight crime by promoting respect for the police. We need police to serve as role models.  Contacts with the police create indelible memories in the minds of citizens.  Police have a special responsibility to follow ethical and professional standards.  And citizens should show respect for law enforcement.  There is no excuse for people to harass law enforcement officers....

Chicago Police are still burdened by the requirement that they spend up to 45 minutes filling out a form every time they make a routine investigative stop. People who impose those requirements may be well-intentioned, but they usually fail to weigh the benefit of more bureaucracy against the cost of human lives lost to criminals who now are not stopped.

Fortunately, Superintendent Johnson’s police commanders are working to overcome their hurdles and give officers the tools and support they need to fight crime. Those tools include crime cameras, crime-mapping and predicting patrolling. I saw those tools demonstrated this morning at the Chicago Police Department’s Seventh District, where Commander Kenny Johnson and his crime analysts hold daily strategy meetings to decide where to assign patrol officers. They also run weekly shooting reviews attended by both state and federal prosecutors.

I also learned this morning that Chicago police data reports show that drug arrests lead to violent crime reductions. The most important single variable that reduces shootings in Chicago is to make a drug arrests. That is just a fact. As John Adams famously said, “Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passions, they cannot alter the state of the facts and evidence.”

It is good to see police leaders who are stubborn about facts.  Superintendent Johnson’s police officers do not mindlessly make mass drug arrests.  They arrest drug dealers who disrupt neighborhoods and foment violence.  They do exactly what Ness, Kennedy and Ashcroft did.

There are many notable aspects to this full speech, but I find especially interesting that the Deputy AG (1) references the St. Valentine’s Day Massacre without noting its link to alcohol Prohibition, (2) states that most of Chicago's violence relates to drug trafficking, and (3) asserts drug arrests lead to violent crime reductions.

November 16, 2017 at 11:57 PM | Permalink

Comments

Ironic remarks from this Harvard Law School radicalized filthy traitor to our country. He is the one who Fergusoned the Baltimore police, and caused hundreds of additional young black males to be murdered.

Thank filthy traitor Rosenstein for this:

http://baltimore.cbslocal.com/2017/11/15/baltimore-mayor-crime-violence/

Posted by: David Behar | Nov 17, 2017 12:14:47 AM

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