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January 4, 2018

"The New Reformer DAs"

The title of this post is the title of this lengthy new American Prospect article.  The piece's lengthy subheadline highlights its themes: "As cities grow more progressive, a new breed of prosecutors are winning office and upending the era of lock-’em-up justice. They may hold the key to resisting Trump’s mania for mass incarceration." And here is an excerpt:

District attorneys “are in many ways the most important figures in the system,” says David Alan Sklansky, a Stanford law professor who studies DAs. “They are crucial gatekeepers between the police and the courts. They get to decide who gets charged and what they get charged with. They are the ones who recommend sentencing and negotiate plea agreements.  And since the vast majority of criminal convictions in this country are the result of plea agreements, they are the ones who are negotiating sentences.”

While the war on drugs, mandatory minimums, and discriminatory policing practices have all earned a great deal of scrutiny for creating the levels of mass incarceration we see today, more and more reformers are recognizing the pernicious role that prosecutors — who have a tremendous amount of power and discretion within the system — have played.

John Pfaff, a Fordham law professor and author of the provocative book Locked In, argues that the role low-level drug charges have played in the rise in mass incarceration is overblown. The main drivers, he contends, are the prosecutors in the country’s DA offices. By examining state court data, Pfaff finds that almost all prison population growth since 1994 derives from overzealous prosecutors, who have doubled the rate of felony charges brought against arrestees.

For decades, district attorney politics (almost all counties elect their chief prosecutors) have been relatively conservative affairs, animated by white suburban voters who want assurances of law and order — not by the people of color living in the city and on the receiving end of tough-on-crime policies.  Of the more than 2,400 elected prosecutors in the United States, 95 percent are white, according to the Reflective Democracy Campaign.  In 14 states, all elected prosecutors are white.  Just 1 percent of prosecutors are women of color.

January 4, 2018 at 01:03 PM | Permalink

Comments

Philadelphia elected a new DA. He sued the police, and was an energetic advocate of the rights of criminals. This is a good historical experiment.

I predict a drop in crime. This Soros funded lawyer will claim his social justice agenda is the reason. At the same time, hundreds of criminals are dying from opiate overdoses. That will be the most powerful factor in any decline in the rate of crime in Philadelphia.

Alcohol is the most powerful chemical factor of crime. Lead may be the second most powerful. Opiates are the most powerful chemical factor in the elimination of crime.

Posted by: David Behar | Jan 4, 2018 3:11:42 PM

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