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February 7, 2018

AG Sessions gives full accounting of his full law-and-order approach to his work as Attorney General

Jeff-sessions-attorney-general-630x354Last night, Attorney General Jeff Sessions delivered this extended speech at the Reagan Alumni Association's Celebration of President Reagan's Birthday.  I recommend the full text as a window into how the current AG thinks about and approaches various law enforcement issues, and here are some highlights that ought to interest sentencing fans:

[President Reagan] was elected to stop the dramatic rise in crime that arose after the Great Society.  The violent crime rate tripled from 1964 to 1980.  Robbery tripled. Rape tripled. Aggravated assault nearly tripled. Murder doubled.  The people were not happy.  Personal safety was a huge issue.  The last liberal, as was said, was mugged.

By 1980, judicial activism looked triumphant.  It was praised as a virtue and not a vice.  Originalism seemed to have gone the way of the Dodo.

Ronald Reagan was elected to fix this situation.  He was the law & order candidate — that’s for sure.  It was not Jimmy Carter.  Nixon had run on law and order successfully.

President Reagan promised change and he delivered.  His achievements with regard to legal reform are nothing short of remarkable.  They have not been fully appreciated....

President Reagan was a strong leader and a good boss.  There was never any doubt about what he expected from us.  And I drew a lesson from that: a strong leader is one who makes his expectations simple and clear.  When I became a United States Attorney, I told my staff, “I know why Ronald Reagan put me here: to put crooks in jail and to protect the treasury.”

We took on violent crime, drug dealers, the Miami cocaine cowboys, the mafia, government corruption, waste fraud, and abuse in government programs.

President Reagan signed into law a number of legal reforms that empowered the law enforcement effort.  There was the elimination of parole, the issuing of sentencing guidelines and mandatory minimum sentences in certain cases, the elimination of bail on appeal, and increased bail for dangerous criminals before trial.  We increased the DEA, FBI, ATF, and federal prosecutors.  Many states followed Reagan’s leadership.

I was a prosecutor before these laws went into effect and I was a prosecutor after these laws went into effect.  I can tell you firsthand that they were transformational. These were the biggest changes in law enforcement since the founding of this country.  These laws were critical to re-establishing law and order.

When a criminal knows with certainty that he is facing hard time, he is a lot more willing to cooperate.  When the sentence is uncertain and up to the whims of the judge, criminals are a lot more willing to take a chance.  The certainty of a significant sentence does, in fact, have a deterrent effect.  And the recidivist can’t commit his crimes if he is in the slammer.

We got tough about drug abuse because — as surely as night follows day — violence, addiction and death follow drug activity.  And those who were put in jail in the mid-to-late 1980s could not commit crimes in the 1990s, which is when the steep decline in crime became most apparent.

I mentioned how dire the situation was in 1980.  That was before Reagan. After the changes that we made were put in place, from 1991 to 2014, the violent crime rate was cut in half. So were the murder rate and the robbery rate.  Aggravated assault was cut by 47 percent, and rape was cut by more than one third.  These are remarkable achievements that made this country a better place.  So when I look up at my portrait of Ed Meese on the wall of my conference room, that’s what I think about.  And that example inspires the work that we do every day.

Under President Trump, we are determined to advance President Reagan’s work of restoring the rule of law.  President Trump sent us an order to support our men and women in blue and to “reduce” crime in America.  We embrace that goal and intend to achieve it.  Of course, the anti-crime effort often goes unnoticed no matter how important....

We are hammering violent groups — especially the vicious MS-13.

We are not going to pretend that there is not a law against marijuana, or that it’s not bad for you....

We don’t think illegal drug use is “recreation”.  Lax enforcement, permissive rhetoric, and the media have undermined the essential need to say no to drug use — don’t start.  And we are identifying pill mill doctors and sending large members to the slammer.

We have taken many other steps to restore the rule of law at the Department.  But I’ll be the first to acknowledge that we still have work to do.  There have been some very sharp criticisms about the Department.  I hear these criticisms and welcome the discussion.  Sunlight truly is the best disinfectant.  We will not ignore these problems or hide our heads in the sand.

Much of what we are doing is behind the scenes — matters I can’t discuss publicly.  I’m sure that you can understand why.  We will also make sure that all our employees are treated fairly.

February 7, 2018 at 10:18 AM | Permalink

Comments

Hi. I'm a retired Union worker, not a professional in any way. I thought you might appreciate this video of talkshow host George Galloway interview an author who wants to take back the practice of law 2500 years to Draco. And Galloway doesn't bat an eyelash in defense of civility. At min. 22:00 https://www.rt.com/shows/sputnik/417785-journalism-duty-truth-addict/

Posted by: Victor Miller | Feb 7, 2018 1:03:04 PM

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