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February 21, 2018

Texas board recommends clemency for condemned killer for first time in over a decade

As reported in this local article, headlined "In rare move, Texas parole board recommends clemency for death row inmate Thomas Whitaker," the state which executes the most murderers in modern times is the locale for a rare clemency recommendation for the next scheduled to die. Here are the details:

In an exceedingly rare move, the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles voted Tuesday to recommend a lesser sentence for a death row inmate facing execution.

The board voted unanimously in favor of clemency for Thomas Bartlett Whitaker, a man who is set to die on Thursday evening. The decision now falls on Gov. Greg Abbott, a Republican who can approve or deny the recommendation to change Whitaker’s death sentence to life in prison. The last time the board recommended clemency for a death row inmate was in 2007.

Abbott said at a political rally Tuesday night that he and his staff would base his decision on the facts, circumstances and law. “Any time anybody's life is at stake, that's a very serious matter,” Abbott said. “And it deserves very serious consideration on my part.”

Whitaker, 38, was convicted in the 2003 murders of his mother and 19-year-old brother as part of a plot to get inheritance money. His father, Kent Whitaker, was also shot in the attack but survived and has consistently begged for a life sentence for his son.

“Victims’ rights should mean something in this state, even when the victim is asking for mercy and not vengeance,” Kent Whitaker said at a press conference at the Texas Capitol just before the board’s vote came in.

Keith Hampton, Thomas Whitaker's lawyer, choked up when announcing to the family and the press that the board had recommended clemency. Kent Whitaker's wife cried out and grabbed Whitaker, who let out a sob and held his head in his hands. “Well, we’re going to the governor’s office right now,” Hampton said.

In December 2003, Thomas Whitaker, then 23, came home from dinner with his family knowing that his roommate Chris Brashear was waiting there to kill them, according to court documents. When they entered the house, Brashear shot and wounded Thomas’ father and killed his mother, Patricia, and 19-year-old brother, Kevin. Suspicion turned toward Whitaker in the murder investigation the next June, and he fled to Mexico, according to court documents. He was arrested more than a year later, and his father begged the Fort Bend County District Attorney’s Office not to seek the death penalty.

Whitaker offered to plead guilty to two life sentences, but the prosecution rejected the offer, saying Whitaker wasn’t remorseful and was being manipulative, court records show. They sought the death penalty, and in March 2007, they got it. Brashear was given a life sentence.

Fred Felcman, the original prosecutor in the case, said Tuesday that the parole board made its decision only because of the father’s forgiveness and seemingly didn't take into account the large number of other people affected by the murders, including the victims, the county, the jury and Patricia’s family. He said the board also disregarded testimony from psychiatrists and their own investigators who said Whitaker was manipulative. “I’m trying to figure out why [the board members] think they should commute this, and why the governor should even give it a second thought,” said Felcman, who is first assistant district attorney at Fort Bend County....

Attached to Whitaker’s petition to the board were letters from former prison guards and at least seven death row inmates who thought the condemned man deserved the lesser sentence of life in prison. Kent Whitaker said Tuesday that the guards said he was never a threat, and one said he’d be an asset in general population.

Death row inmates attested to Whitaker’s helpful presence in a prison environment, saying he encouraged them to better themselves, helped those with mental illness and could easily calm inmates down. William Speer, who has been on death row since 2001 for a prison murder, wrote in 2011 that the prison system needs more men like Whitaker to keep other inmates calm. “Of all the people I have met over the years Thomas Whitaker is the person I believe deserves clemency the most,” Speer wrote, according to the petition. “He is one of the best liked inmates on this farm by the guards and other inmates, and he has worked the hardest to rehabilitate himself.”...

Despite the board’s surprise recommendation on Tuesday afternoon, Whitaker was still scheduled for execution on Thursday after 6 p.m. If Abbott rejects the recommendation and the Supreme Court justices dismiss his appeals, he will become the fourth man executed in Texas — and the nation — in 2018. There are three other executions scheduled in Texas through May.

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February 21, 2018 at 09:18 AM | Permalink


I'm hoping that's a paraphrase because I don't know exactly why the parole board would consider the impact this murder had on the jury or why there would be any impact beyond the trauma of having to go through a trial at the request of the prosecutor and the trauma of having to impose a death sentence.

Posted by: Erik M | Feb 21, 2018 12:01:38 PM

Gov. Abbott commuted the sentence at the request of the father. My understanding is that sentencing is not personal. It is not retribution on behalf of victims. It is on behalf of all of a jurisdiction, for the standard 5 purposes of sentencing. The way that vengeance is not appropriate in sentencing, forgiveness should not appropriate. I do not know if the Governor is a lawyer. If he is, he has negated his training in the criminal law.

I have also said, many times, the remedy for the lack of morality defect in antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) is the structured setting of prison. The feature of ASPD of excellent social skills, and manipulativeness is being used to calm agitated patients. This is a positive trait in prison, and a negative one on the street.

Posted by: David Behar | Feb 23, 2018 9:33:56 AM

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