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March 3, 2018

Jim DeMint explains how "core of conservatism" at core of South Carolina's leadership on criminal justice reform

Jim DeMint, a former US Senator from South Carolina, has recently become of significant conservative voice in support of various criminal justice reforms. His latest commentary, appearing here under the headline "How Jim DeMint wants SC lawmakers to redefine ‘tough on crime’," links conservative principles and recent reforms and proposals in the Palmetto State. Here are excerpts:

The core of conservatism is the dignity of every individual and the value of every life.  That’s why we talk about individual freedom, self-reliance and personal responsibility. Conservatives fight for limited government to preserve these sacred goals.  And that’s why we care about prison reform.  The values conservatives hold dear are jeopardized when prisons fail to deliver results.  We owe it to victims, law enforcement and the citizens of our communities to act.

In 2010, South Carolina showed the nation how a conservative state can lead on criminal justice reform.  Back then, we stood squarely at a crossroads.  Our prison population was growing at an unsustainable rate, and we were forecasting the need to burden our taxpayers by building more prisons.  We had to take action.  The Palmetto State could go to an old playbook of tough on crime: incarcerate more, spend more and break an already strained budget.  Or we could redefine what it means to be “tough on crime” by adopting smart policies aimed at keeping people safer, reintegrating citizens into the community and taming expensive correctional spending.

Fortunately, state leaders chose a new direction.  S.1154 addressed the enormous number of people churning in and out of our prisons for low-level nonviolent crimes and violations of supervision conditions.  They also established the Sentencing Reform Oversight Committee, made up of legislators, stakeholders and policy experts, to track the law’s performance and make ongoing recommendations for reform in the future.

The results were transformative.  Our violent and property crime decreased by 16 percent, and recidivism dropped by 10 percent.  Our prison population dropped by 14 percent. As a result, we have shut down seven facilities and saved taxpayers nearly half a billion dollars.  Today, based on this innovative approach and the tireless efforts of the men and women at the departments of Corrections and Parole and Probation Services trusted with its implementation, more people are returning to their families and communities and becoming productive, tax-paying citizens.

As reforms outperformed our expectations, skeptics became believers, and practitioners in courtrooms and the corrections system have built a culture of following evidence-based practices.

Still, our prisons are understaffed and struggle with a growing threat of violence within facilities. Therefore, we should pursue evidence based-reform that we know can deliver results. Prison resources should be spent on those who pose a threat to public safety and are not wasted denying liberty to those who can be safely supervised in the community....

Nearly 80 percent of the prison population is still incarcerated for non-violent offenses.  Those convicted are staying in prison too long, nearly a third longer than in 2010.  Our system drains $500 million from taxpayers and has a negative impact on families and communities.  There are also gaps in supervision best-practices that don’t meet the high standard we should hold ourselves to.

March 3, 2018 at 03:03 PM | Permalink

Comments

He mentions the dignity of every person. How is it dignified to be the victim of a released prisoner? As to non-violent drug dealers, they are all serial killers of their competitors. Their mandatory sentencing dropped the murder rate 40%.

Evidence based practices are quackery. This is a review of that reasoning in medicine, but it applies to criminal practice research. Most of it is political agenda driven. There is a selection bias in the publication of studies.

http://davidbeharmdejd.blogspot.com/search/label/Evidence%20Based%20Medicine

Posted by: David Behar | Mar 3, 2018 3:23:57 PM

Conservatives support the value of every life, and conveniently don't mention their (and DeMint's) support of the death penalty. That conservative value of limited government is threatened by all the conservative support - past and present - for tough on crime.

If this guy had been around during the 1980s, 1990s and earlier 2000s, would his conservative principles led him to oppose the moves of his party to get tough?

Posted by: Paul | Mar 5, 2018 8:58:19 AM

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