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April 22, 2018

SCOTUS to hear seemingly small sentencing case made slightly bigger by Government's advocate

On Monday afterneed the Supreme Court will hear oral argument in Chavez-Meza v. United States.  Here is the issue presented in the case (via SCOTUSblog):

Whether, when a district court decides not to grant a proportional sentence reduction under 18 U.S.C. § 3582(c)(2), it must provide some explanation for its decision when the reasons are not otherwise apparent from the record, as the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the 6th, 8th, 9th and 11th Circuits have held, or whether it can issue its decision without any explanation so long as it is issued on a preprinted form order containing the boilerplate language providing that the court has “tak[en] into account the policy statement set forth in 18 U.S.S.G. § 1B1.10 and the sentencing factors set forth in 18 U.S.C. § 3553(a), to the extent that they are applicable,” as the U.S. Courts of Appeals for the 4th, 5th and 10th Circuits have held.

As this statement of the issue reveals, the Supreme Court likely was inclined to add this case to its docket in order to resolve a circuit split over just want amount of explanation is required when judges grant sentence modifications under 18 U.S.C. § 3582(c)(2).  But, it appears that only six months of a nine-year prison term is at issue in this case and, as Susan Klein explains via her SCOTUSblog argument preview, it seems unlikely that even a win for the defendant would be all that consequential for others:

I predict that whatever the Supreme Court does in this case will have little effect beyond amending future sentencing modification forms. A reversal would likely result in little more than a “ritualistic incantation” by the judge that she considered a specific Section 3553(a) factor, or that she considered a specific policy statement issued by the sentencing commission.

Of course, SCOTUS could always decide to use this case to talk up the importance of sentencing explanations, though I doubt even an opinion written with great ambition in this matter would have too much of an impact.  And still, though seemingly a small case, Chavez-Meza is getting an extra bit of attention because the Deputy Attorney General will be arguing the case on behalf of the feds.  This new Wall Street Journal article, headlined "Rosenstein Takes a Pause — to Argue a Case Before the Supreme Court," looks at this angle of the case.  (Last but not least, hard-core Breaking Bad fans might get a weird kick out of the fact that Adaucto Chavez-Meza "distributed methamphetamine in Albuquerque, New Mexico," though a bit later than when Walter White was supposedly cooking up the Blue Sky variety in that part of the world.)

April 22, 2018 at 08:47 PM | Permalink

Comments

Was Breading Bad the cross-over with the Great English Baking Show?

Posted by: RW | Apr 23, 2018 10:41:14 AM

Thanks for catching my now fixed typo, RW, and also suggesting a great name for a great new show!

Posted by: Doug B | Apr 23, 2018 11:01:32 AM

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