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May 3, 2018

"The Opioid Crisis and Federal Criminal Prosecution"

The title of this post is the title of this timely new article recently posted to SSRN authored by Rachel Rothberg and Kate Stith. Here are parts of its introduction:

An opioid crisis has swept the United States, ravaging communities across the country. In this Article we examine how federal law enforcement has responded to the crisis, both nationally and in a variety of locales.  We focus in depth, however, on federal investigators and prosecutors in the District of Connecticut, where the epidemic has hit hard....

What role can criminal law — and those who enforce it — play in combatting the opioid crisis?  The Connecticut U.S. Attorney’s Office’s shift in policy represents just one of many federal law enforcement reactions to alarming increases in opioid abuse and overdose deaths.  As opioid users’ tolerance increases and their access to prescription pills dwindle, they often transition to cheaper heroin, and then again to the more powerful synthetic opioids — sometimes unwittingly.  In general, law enforcement has struggled to keep up with the epidemic and the opioid market’s evolving characteristics.

In Part II of this Article we provide an overview of the nationwide, interagency efforts initiated by the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C.  In Part III, we briefly survey a number of strategies pursued by various U.S. Attorney’s Offices.  There are ninety-three U.S. Attorney’s Offices in the United States, and although all of them are part of the Department of Justice, each one is semi-autonomous in deciding which cases to investigate and prosecute.

Then, in Part IV, we narrow our focus to the federal prosecutorial efforts of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Connecticut.  We focus on the Office’s two main strategies— (1) charging the supplier of an illicit substance resulting in death with the crime of drug distribution; and (2) educating the community, particularly high-school students, about opioid usage — and discuss whether they have implications for the national role of federal law enforcement.  Lastly, in Part V, we address what more might be needed from federal law enforcement going forward to protect communities nationwide from the devastation wrought by opioid proliferation.

May 3, 2018 at 11:10 AM | Permalink

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