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July 12, 2018

AG Jeff Sessions "surges" federal war against synthetic opioids in select counties

This new press release from the US Justice Department, headed "Attorney General Jeff Sessions Announces the Formation of Operation Synthetic Opioid Surge (S.O.S.)," reports on a notable new federal front in the modern war on drugs. Here are the details (with my emphasis added):

Attorney General Jeff Sessions today announced Operation Synthetic Opioid Surge (S.O.S.), a new program that seeks to reduce the supply of deadly synthetic opioids in high impact areas and to identify wholesale distribution networks and international and domestic suppliers.

As part of Operation S.O.S., the Department will launch an enforcement surge in ten districts with some of the highest drug overdose death rates. Each participating United States Attorney’s Office (USAO) will choose a specific county and prosecute every readily provable case involving the distribution of fentanyl, fentanyl analogues, and other synthetic opioids, regardless of drug quantity. The surge will involve a coordinated DEA Special Operations Division operation to insure that leads from street-level cases are used to identify larger scale distributors. Operation S.O.S. was inspired by a promising initiative of the United States Attorney’s Office in the Middle District of Florida involving Manatee County, Florida.

"We at the Department of Justice are going to dismantle these deadly fentanyl distribution networks. Simply put, we will be tireless until we reduce the number of overdose deaths in this country. We are going to focus on some of the worst counties for opioid overdose deaths in the United States, working all cases until we have disrupted the supply of these deadly drugs," Attorney General Sessions said. "In 2016, synthetic opioids killed more Americans than any other kind of drug.  Three milligrams of fentanyl can be fatal — that's not even enough to cover up Lincoln's face on a penny. Our prosecutors in Manatee County, Florida have shown that prosecuting seemingly small synthetic opioids cases can have a big impact and save lives, and we want to replicate their success in the districts that need it most.  Operation S.O.S. — and the new prosecutors who will help carry it out — will help us put more traffickers behind bars and keep the American people safe from the threat of these deadly drugs."...

In Manatee County, a county just south of Tampa with a population of about 320,000, overdoses and deaths skyrocketed in 2015 (780 overdoses/84 opioid related deaths) and 2016 (1,287 overdoses/123 opioid related deaths). In summer of 2016, local law enforcement reported frequent, street-level distribution of fentanyl and carfentanil for the first time.

To combat this crisis, the Middle District of Florida committed to prosecuting every readily provable drug distribution case involving synthetic opioids in Manatee County regardless of drug quantity.  The effort resulted in the indictments of forty five traffickers of synthetic opioids.  Further, from the last six months of 2016 to the last six months of 2017, overdoses dropped by 77.1% and deaths dropped by 74.2%. Overall, the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office went from responding to 11 overdoses a day to an average now of less than one per day.

I am not at all keen on the idea of federalizing every small local drug case, but these reported data from Manatee County, Florida leads me to understand why AG Sessions might want to try to expand a program that he believes has proven distinctly effective. The Attorney General also delivered this speech in conjunction with the announcement of this new surge. Here is how he described the new initiative:

It’s called Operation Synthetic Opioid Surge — or S.O.S.

I am ordering our prosecutors in 10 districts with some of the highest overdose death rates—including this one—to systematically and relentlessly prosecute every synthetic opioid case. We can weaken these networks, reduce fentanyl availability, and save lives.

We are going to arrest, prosecute, and convict fentanyl dealers and we are going to put them in jail. When it comes to synthetic opioids, there is no such thing as a small case.

Three milligrams of fentanyl can be fatal. That’s equivalent a pinch of salt. It’s not even enough to cover up Lincoln’s face on a penny. Depending on the purity, you could fit more than 1,000 fatal doses of fentanyl in a teaspoon.

I want to be clear about this: we are not focusing on users, but on those supplying them with deadly drugs.

Manatee County, Florida shows that a united and determined effort, focusing on fentanyl dealers, can save lives. Your counterparts in the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the Middle District of Florida tried this strategy in Manatee County, which is just south of Tampa. Like many parts of this country, they had experienced massive increases in opioid deaths in 2015 and 2016.

In response, they began prosecuting synthetic opioid sales, regardless of the amount. They prosecuted 45 synthetic opioids traffickers—and deaths started to go down. From the first six months of 2016 to 2017, overdose deaths dropped by 22 percent. This past January, they had nearly a quarter fewer overdoses as the previous January. The Manatee County Sheriff’s Office went from responding to 11 overdoses a day to an average of one a day. Those are remarkable results.

As you implement this proven strategy, I am sending in reinforcements to help you. Last month, I sent more than 300 new AUSAs to districts across America .... It was the largest prosecutor surge in decades.

Today I am announcing that each of these ten districts where the drug crisis is worst will receive an additional prosecutor. As a former AUSA and U.S. Attorney myself, I know what you can do — and my expectations could not be higher. Our goal is to reduce crime, reduce fentanyl, and to reduce deaths, plain and simple. I believe that this new strategy and these additional prosecutors will have a significant impact.

July 12, 2018 at 04:43 PM | Permalink

Comments

another war on drugs? yawn.....

As long as you keep marijuana a Schedule I drug, no one is going to listen to you about really dangerous stuff.

Posted by: Peter from Vermont | Jul 12, 2018 5:30:30 PM

whack-a-mole--heroin, cocaine, crack, meth, ecstacy, fentanyl, and on and on and on

Posted by: Emily | Jul 12, 2018 5:32:33 PM

Echoing the other commenters -- how many times do we have to try this particular brand of stupidity and have it fail before we admit that it's just not going to work?

Posted by: William Jockusch | Jul 12, 2018 8:13:43 PM

Oh but it does, it brings in big bucks to enforcement. That's the goal, the words about protecting the public are just a smoke screen.

Posted by: Soronel Haetir | Jul 12, 2018 10:16:09 PM

The main effort needs to be on drug companies making an excessive qty and where its distributed right from their plants. Need to control the source ingredients and their final product.

The excessive sentences must be targetd at the drug companies. Start with the Pres, ceo cfo and all managers right down the org chart.

This is how you win the opiod war, right now.

Also Drs are pretty much in a sense drug dealers. Look at all the crap they push.

Look at all the law suites on TV about a dozen or so drugs. We are a society that starts out with our kids getting oills from a dr and then it escallates from there.

We will never win this war, too much money at the top. Oh well.

Posted by: MidWestGuy | Jul 13, 2018 7:04:23 AM

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