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July 13, 2018

Detailing how recent reforms have helped Louisiana shrink its incarceration rate to no longer be nation's leader

Ranking have a way of capturing attention, and this new Pew article reporting on a notable change in state rankings caught my eye.  The piece is headlined "Louisiana No Longer Leads Nation in Imprisonment Rate: New data show impact of 2017 criminal justice reforms," and here are excerpts:

Louisiana no longer leads the nation in imprisonment, one year after enacting a landmark package of 10 criminal justice reform laws. In June 2018, Oklahoma became the U.S. state with the highest imprisonment rate, replacing Louisiana, which had been the nation’s prison capital for nearly 20 years.

The numbers are based on calculations by The Pew Charitable Trusts, which analyzed data from the state corrections departments and population estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. At the beginning of June, the imprisonment rate in Louisiana was 712 per 100,000 residents, compared with 719 per 100,000 residents in Oklahoma. Louisiana now ranks second in imprisonment. The numbers in both states far exceeded the national rate, including state and federal prisoners, which was 450 per 100,000 residents at the end of 2016.

The latest data reinforce a central lesson of criminal justice reform in the past decade: States’ policy choices can help control the size and cost of their prison systems and protect public safety. Although implementation of Louisiana’s reforms is still in the early stages, the Department of Public Safety and Corrections and the Commission on Law Enforcement released a report in June with some initial results that show quick and solid progress since the first pieces of legislation went into effect in August 2017....

After a year’s worth of data analysis and study by the task force, the Legislature in 2017 passed and the governor signed the most significant overhaul of criminal justice laws in state history. The package of 10 bills — sponsored by six Republicans, two Democrats, and one independent — steers people convicted of less serious crimes away from prison, strengthens incarceration alternatives, reduces prison terms for those who can be safely supervised in the community, removes barriers to re-entry into the community, and bolsters programs that support victims of crime.

Louisiana’s landmark reforms are perhaps the most dramatic example of a state taking greater control of its prison growth and spending, but many others have acted as well. More than 30 states have adopted reforms, spurring shifts in imprisonment rate rankings. In 2007, for example, Texas began investing hundreds of millions of dollars in various treatment and diversion programs.  The state dropped from third place in 2008 to seventh by the end of 2016, the most recent year for which complete national data are available. In South Carolina, comprehensive reforms enacted in 2010 helped move the state from ninth to 20th.

Pew also this week released this Fact Sheet on state reform efforts under the heading "35 States Reform Criminal Justice Policies Through Justice Reinvestment."

July 13, 2018 at 04:37 PM | Permalink

Comments

Self help and killing violent criminals is the sole effective remedy to violent crime. Every thing else is rent seeking lawyer bullshit.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/‘in-all-reality-there-were-three-shooters’-oklahomans-kill-an-active-shooter-and-it’s-not-as-simple-as-it-sounds/ar-AAA1hQP?ocid=spartanntp

Posted by: David Behar | Jul 14, 2018 3:07:24 AM

You may not use the reported arrests. Baltimore was Fergusoned by Rod Rosenstein. Arresst went from 100,000 a year to 25,000 a year. The murder and crime rates are much higher. Arrest records are not a good indicator of the real burden of crime.

Posted by: Dsvid Behar | Jul 14, 2018 6:55:02 PM

An idiot is an idiot, is an idiot, is an idiot.

Posted by: Claudio Giusti | Jul 15, 2018 4:55:39 PM

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