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August 25, 2018

"Summonsing Criminal Desistance: Convicted Felons' Perspectives on Jury Service"

The title of this post is the title of this interesting paper authored by James Binnall recently posted to SSRN.  Here is its abstract:

This exploratory study is the first to examine how convicted felons view the jury process and their role in that process.  Data derived from interviews with former and prospective felon-jurors in Maine, the only US jurisdiction that does not restrict a convicted felon’s opportunity to serve as a juror, reveal that participants displayed an idealized view of jury service, stressing a commitment to serve conscientiously.  Additionally, inclusion in the jury process affirmed their transitions from “offenders” to “non-offenders.”  In response, participants exhibited a sense of particularized self-worth, emphasizing that negative experiences with the criminal justice system make one a more effective juror.  In sum, this study suggests that among convicted felons, inclusion in the jury process may prompt conformity with the “ideal juror” role, facilitate prosocial identity shifts by mitigating the “felon” label, and help former offenders to find personal value.

August 25, 2018 at 08:03 AM | Permalink

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