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October 2, 2018

New "Square One Project" already producing terrific paper on re-imagining criminal justice policy

Square-One-logo-300x300This posting from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation (LJAF) describes a notable new criminal justice reform effort that formally launched a few weeks ago:

The Square One Project, a three-year initiative to rethink justice policies from top to bottom, launched [on September 20] at D.C.’s National Press Club.  Square One brings together a diverse cross-section of academics, policymakers, and community organizers to re-examine traditional responses to crime and envision a new paradigm that can address systemic inequalities such as poverty and racial discrimination.  The Columbia University Justice Lab, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, and Laura and John Arnold Foundation (LJAF) support the project.

Square One seeks to reform a criminal justice system in urgent need of change . Over the last four decades, the number of people in America’s prisons and jails has increased 500 percent.  Prisons are overcrowded, states struggle to fund basic services, and racial inequities inherent in the system have devastated communities. “The project asks: If we set aside the traditional response to crime, and ask first whether other responses might be more effective — if we begin at ‘square one’ — how would criminal justice policy be different?” said Kelli Rhee, President and CEO of LJAF.

The initiative consists of three core components: an executive session focusing on justice policy; roundtables in cities across the country; and a comprehensive community engagement and communications strategy. In the executive session, about 30 leading experts, practitioners, and scholars will meet twice a year to develop and refine proposals. “This format will test and push participants to challenge their own thinking and consider new options,” said Bruce Western, co-director of the Columbia University Justice Lab. “These frank, off-the-record discussions will ultimately yield fresh discourse and new research among academics, policymakers, practitioners, and communities.”

Roundtable sessions will invite broader engagement with community members and a variety of stakeholder groups, tackling a single, complex policy challenge. The first Square One roundtable is scheduled for Oct. 11-13 in Durham, N.C., in partnership with North Carolina Central University.  The discussions, held at the NCCU School of Law, will be live-streamed.

As shown in this page at Square One's website, the executive session part of the project is already producing some very interesting papers by some very interesting people:

Though I am not sure if additional papers will be emerging from the Square One executive sessions or the roundtables, I am sure folks interested in thinking deeply about the present and future of criminal justice policies and practices in the United States should be watching what this project continued to produce.

October 2, 2018 at 09:03 AM | Permalink

Comments

There are several major themes already in play concerning changes in the criminal justice system. First, bail reform, because the current system so favors the moneyed classes over the poor. Keeping people in jail as pre-trial detainees is expensive, and also ends up getting innocent people to plead guilty, just to get out of jail and back to work before they lose their jobs and homes. Second, drug and alcohol treatment is coming to be favored over incarceration, so treat the underlying causes of perhaps 75% of all crimes. Third, except for the truly violent defendants, the sentences of most defendants are far too long and expensive for the taxpayers. Fourth, inmates need to be taught employable skills and taught how to re-enter society, so they don't return to committing crimes upon release.

Posted by: Jim Gormley | Oct 2, 2018 1:40:41 PM

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