Monday, July 23, 2007

Commentaries and editorials on border agents case

A new week brings a new set of commentaries and editorials about the border agents case.  Interestingly, as the headlines below suggest, not everyone has the same perspective on this case:

Commentary here from Debra Saunders, "Where's George Bush: Free the Border Patrol Two"

Commentary here from Rick Lowry, "Justice demands sentence commutation for border agents"

Editorial here from the Houston Chronicle, "Border incident Inflexible sentencing law — not prosecutor — created long sentence for rogue border agents"

Editorial here from the Sacramento Bee, "Feinstein takes the low road with border agents: With a grandstanding hearing and a letter to Bush, senator stoops to tarnish -- herself"

Some prior posts about the Border Agents case:

July 23, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Friday, July 20, 2007

Report on Genarlow Wilson argument in Georgia

The AP has this article providing the basics of today's argument before the Georgia Supreme Court in the Genarlow Wilson case.  Here are a few snippets:

Attorney General Thurbert Baker argues that the order to free Wilson, if upheld, could be used to help free some 1,300 child molesters from Georgia prison.  "We urge you to look beyond the confines of this case," Senior Assistant Attorney General Paula Smith told the court's seven justices Friday.

Wilson's lawyer, B.J. Bernstein, said that Wilson's decade-long mandatory sentence violated the constitutional ban on cruel and unusual punishment.  "Every day that a defendant spends in jail is a precious day in their life," Bernstein said.

The justices seemed to be wrestling with how to provide Wilson relief under the law. "We have a responsibility to enforce the law," Justice Robert Benham asked.  "Should we do that at the expense of fairness?"

How Appealing has more coverage of the argument at this link.

July 20, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (3) | TrackBack

Wednesday, July 18, 2007

Bipartisan call for commuting border agent sentences

Especially in these partisan times, it is encouraging to see bipartisanship on any issue.  And, as detailed in this Lou Dobbs commentary, the extreme sentences for former border agents Ignacio Ramos and Jose Compean has brought leading Senators from both sides of the aisle together:

There was an unusual spectacle in the nation's capital Tuesday, downright rare, in fact: U.S. Senators seeking truth, and justice, and taking action.  And they deserve great credit and thanks. The Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, led by Dianne Feinstein, focused on the reasons for the prosecution of two Border Patrol agents now serving long sentences in federal prison.  Border Patrol Agents Ignacio Ramos and Jose Compean were given terms of 11 and 12 years respectively on their convictions for shooting an illegal alien drug smuggler. Senator Feinstein, and Senators Jeff Sessions, John Cornyn, Jon Kyl and Tom Coburn demanded answers of U.S. Attorney Johnny Sutton, who chose to prosecute Compean and Ramos and give that illegal alien drug smuggler blanket immunity to testify against the men....

Senator Feinstein and Senator Cornyn announced Tuesday night on our broadcast that they have decided to request that President Bush commute the sentences of Ramos and Compean.

Some prior posts about the Border Agents case:

July 18, 2007 in Clemency and Pardons, Examples of "over-punishment", Scope of Imprisonment, Who Sentences? | Permalink | Comments (13) | TrackBack

Tuesday, July 17, 2007

Reports on Senate hearing on Border Agent case

Reports from the Houston Chronicle, from the AP, from The Hill and from The Corner at NRO provide some highlights from Tuesday's Senate Judiciary Committee hearing examining the prosecution and sentencing of former border agents Ignacio Ramos and Jose Compean.  Also available at this official site are links to the witnesses' written testimony and an archived webcast of the hearing.

Some prior posts about the Border Agents case:

July 17, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Sunday, July 15, 2007

Senate hearing on Border Agent prosecutions

As detailed at this official site, the Senate Committee on the Judiciary has scheduled a "Hearing to Examine the Prosecution of Ignacio Ramos and Jose Compean" for the morning of Tuesday, July 17, 2007.  Notably, Senator Dianne Feinstein is slated to preside. 

As I have explained in many prior posts (some of which are linked below), I think the prosecution and sentencing of these former border agents  spotlight the many flaws with mandatory sentencing provisions and the severe penalties that some defendants receive largely for exercising their right to go to trial rather than pleading guilty.  I am hopeful that these sentencing issues will be a big part of the Senate hearing.

Some prior posts about the Border Agents case:

July 15, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Thursday, July 12, 2007

Prosecutors gone wild

This AP story chronicles the latest saga in the sad tale that is the Genarlow Wilson case (details in this archive) out of Georgia.  Here are snippets:

David McDade has handed out some 35 copies of a video of teenagers having sex at a party.  McDade is no porno kingpin, but a district attorney.  And he says Georgia's open-records law leaves him no choice but to release the footage because it was evidence in one of the state's most turbulent cases — that of Genarlow Wilson, a young man serving 10 years in prison for having oral sex with a girl when they were teenagers.  McDade's actions have opened him up to accusations that he is vindictively misusing his authority to keep Wilson behind bars — and worse, distributing child pornography.

UPDATE:  I see two remarkable new posts at Above the Law suggesting that Mr. McDade has a track record that should make good prosecutors cringe:

The saddest part of all this, of course, is that McDade continues to wreck havoc on Georgia justice while Genarlow Wilson remains behind bars.  It is a sad shame that Georgia's Attorney General and Governor are far less concerned about the unjustifiable activities of rogue prosecutors than about teenagers' consensual sexual activities.

July 12, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (8) | TrackBack

Wednesday, June 27, 2007

Genarlow Wilson to remain in prison, despite ruling that his sentence is unconstitutional

Howard Bashman notes reports from the AP and from the Atlanta Journal-Constitution that a state judge has now ruled that Genarlow Wilson is not eligible for bond pending the state's appeal of a ruling that his sentence is unconstitutional.  As previously detailed here and here, lower court has already ruled that Wilson's original sentence was unconstitutional, although that ruling due to be review by the Georgia Supreme COurt in the fall (details here).

I do not quite understand why executive officials in Georgia believe it is necessary and appropriate — or even lawful — to keep Wilson in prison when the last state judge to review this case has declared Wilson's sentence unconstitutional.  I understand that the Georgia Attorney General regards the lower court's ruling as problematic.  But given that the AG apparently recognizes that Wilson presents no risk of flight or dangerousness, shouldn't he agree to Wilson's release pending appeal.  Indeed, might one argue that it is unconstitutional for the Georgia AG to continued Wilson's imprisonment under these circumstances?

June 27, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (11) | TrackBack

Tuesday, June 26, 2007

Putting money where the sentencing injustice is

As detailed in articles appearing in USA Today and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, a "New York investment manager and 10 of his friends have pledged $1 million in cash to try to win the release of a Georgia man imprisoned for a consensual sex act."  Here are more details from the USA Today article:

Genarlow Wilson, 21, is serving a 10-year sentence for receiving oral sex from a 15-year-old girl when he was 17.  He has been behind bars for more than 28 months.  Two weeks ago, a Monroe County judge ordered his release.  Because Georgia Attorney General Thurbert Baker appealed, however, Wilson remains in prison.

"A miscarriage of justice has occurred here, yet he's still in jail," says Whitney Tilson, a mutual and hedge fund manager who will commit $100,000 of his own money to a bond fund for Wilson.  Tilson, who is founder and managing partner of T2 Partners Management LP and Tilson Mutual Funds, read about Wilson's case in December and thought his punishment was excessive.

Related posts will background on the Genarlow Wilson case:

June 26, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Thursday, June 14, 2007

Notable coverage of Genarlow Wilson saga

Coverage of the Genarlow Wilson case continues to provide interesting food-for-thought.  Anyone following the Wilson case closely will definitely want to check out these two interesting articles:

Following up the AJC article, this AP article has now hit the wires, headlined "Prosecutor meddling in teen sex case?  Mother of girl changed statement to newspaper after visit by assistant DA."

UPDATE:  This AP story reports that "Georgia's Supreme Court agreed Thursday to hear the state's arguments for keeping in prison a man who had consensual sex with a 15-year-old girl when he was 17.  The story also provides more details about reactions to the case and the decision by the Georgia AG to appeal.

June 14, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (6) | TrackBack

Parents start serving 27 months for serving alcohol at son's 16th birthday party

Cover_large The Washington Post in this editorial, and David Bernstein here at The Volokh Conpirary, are justifiably spotlighting the apparent injustice in this story of two parents given 27-month(!) jail terms for having provided beer and wine at a backyard birthday party for their son when he turned 16. 

According to the Post editorial, the prosecutors "originally sought a three-month sentence," but apparently a juvenile court judge "originally imposed eight-year sentences" only an appeals court cut the sentence to the 27 months now to be served.

Commentors at Volokh indicate that the parents' wrongdoing went beyond just serving alcohol.  But, geez, wouldn't the three-month sentence (or even six months or nine months) sought by prosecutors have been sufficient?  I have long thought that any sentence more than twice what a prosecutor requests should be considered presumptively (though not per se) unreasonable. 

More details about this case and related matters are available in this cover article from a publication called "The Hook."  The article spotlights that the long sentence given to the parents should have a profound deterrence effect, though I'd think a shorter sentence could do the trick.  Can anyone suggest reasons why such a long jail sentence is necessary under these circumstances?

June 14, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (7) | TrackBack

Wednesday, June 13, 2007

Genarlow Wilson faces at least another month in prison

As detailed in this Atlanta Journal-Constitution article, despite a big win in his state habeas action overturning his initial sentence, "Genarlow Wilson will remain behind bars at least until next month, when a judge will decide whether he should be released from prison pending an appeal."  Here are some more details:

Wilson, now 21, moved a step closer to freedom Monday when Monroe County Superior Court Judge Thomas H. Wilson granted his petition to throw out his 10-year prison sentence.  The judge agreed the sentence "would be viewed by society as 'cruel and unusual' in the constitutional sense of disproportionality." The judge also ordered him freed from prison and changed his felony conviction to a misdemeanor without the requirement that he register as a sex offender.

Within hours, however, state Attorney General Thurbert Baker filed notice that he would appeal the ruling to the Georgia Supreme Court.  Baker is arguing the judge overstepped his authority. Several civil rights activists demonstrated outside Baker's office Monday, calling on him to back off his appeal or resign. "I think he should be admired for standing up in the face of all that and doing his job," [Douglas County District Attorney David] McDade said. "His sworn duty is to protect all Georgians."

Related posts will background on the Wilson case:

June 13, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (4) | TrackBack

Monday, June 11, 2007

Georgia AG appeals to keep Genarlow Wilson locked up

This new CNN article disappointingly reports that the Attorney General of Georgia "quickly filed a notice of appeal, keeping Genarlow Wilson in prison for the time being" in the wake of the state court ruling earlier today reducing his crime and sentence (basics here and here).  Here are more details:

The prosecutor's move brought an abrupt halt to the jubilation Wilson's mother, Juannessa Bennett, and his attorney, B.J. Bernstein, were feeling, and the plans they were making for Bennett to be reunited with her son.  "It is extremely, extremely disturbing that the attorney general would take this action now," Bernstein said, adding that she did not know what message "he's trying to send" or "who he's representing."

In a written statement, Georgia Attorney General Thurbert Baker said he filed the appeal to resolve "clearly erroneous legal issues," saying that while the judge did have the authority to grant habeas relief, he did not have the authority "to reduce or modify the judgment of the trial court."  Separately, Baker noted that Douglas County recently had offered a plea deal "that would have allowed Genarlow Wilson to plead to First Offender Treatment, which would mean that he would not have a criminal record nor would he be subject to registering on the sex offender registry once his sentence had been completed."

I would be interested to hear reactions from current and former prosecutors about the Georgia AG's decision to so swiftly seek an appeal.  I also wonder, if Baker is comfortable with a plea deal that gets close to the same result as the court ruling, why the rush to appeal?

June 11, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (21) | TrackBack

Snippets from the Wilson ruling from Georgia

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution now has this coverage of the state court ruling reducing the crime and sentence of Genarlow Wilson (basics here).  There is a written opinion supporting the rule, and here are inspiring snippets:

In the Petitioner's case, the imposition of the rnandatory minimum 10-year prison sentence without parole and sex offender registration for consensual oral sex between teenagers would be viewed by society as "cruel and unusual" in the constitutional sense of disproportionality, especially in light of Petitioner's having never been convicted of a prior crime....

If this Court, or any Court, cannot recognize the injustice of what has occurred here, then our court system has lost sight of the goal our judicial system has always strived to accomplish — Justice being served in a fair and equal manner.

When I first heard about the Wilson case last December, I explained here and here why I thought Genarlow had a viable Eighth Amendment claim.  I am glad a state judge in this case agreed.  Now if the state prosecutors could have the good sense not to bother with an appeal.

June 11, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (8) | TrackBack

Genarlow Wilson prevails in state habeas appeal

Good news for folks like me hoping that justice would prevail in the Genarlow Wilson case.  Here is the early report from the AP of today's major development in the case:

A judge on Monday voided a 10-year sentence for a man accused of having consensual oral sex with a 15-year-old girl when he was 17.  He instead gave Genarlow Wilson a 12-month misdemeanor sentence with credit for time already served.  The state is likely to appeal the ruling.

Wilson's original sentence, for aggravated child molestation, was widely criticized on the grounds it was grossly disproportionate to the crime, and state lawmakers later passed a law to close the loophole that led to the 10-year sentence. 

Wilson, now 21, has already served more than 27 months.  He could remain behind bars while the appeal proceeds.

I am not quite sure why (or even how) Wilson can remain incarcerated if he has now been given a sentence that has been fully served.  I suppose there may be a mechanism under state law for prosecutors to stay the sentence change ordered today, but I sure hope Wilson gets his release very soon.  He certainly does not seem like a flight risk or a danger to the community.

Related posts will background on the Wilson case:

June 11, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (6) | TrackBack

Friday, June 08, 2007

More strong calls for justice for Genarlow Wilson

Because I was in Atlanta this morning for an Eleventh Circuit argument (reported by the media here and here), I saw the print copy of this extended editorial in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution entitled, "Teen's search for justice: Genarlow Wilson's 10-year sentence for consensual sex ought to be thrown out by judge."  TChris at TalkLeft here discusses the editorial and the fact that former President Jimmy Carter has spoken out in favor of justice for Genarlow.  A ruling on Wilson's state habeas action is expected on Monday.

Recent related posts:

June 8, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Wednesday, June 06, 2007

Genarlow Wilson state habeas appeal update

A scheduled hearing on Genarlow Wilson's state habeas action has the Atlanta Journal-Constitution again discussing this remarkable case with this article, entitled "Sex landed him in prison; will petition bail him out?", and this op-ed by columnist Cynthia Tucker, entitled "Genarlow Wilson should be free."  For a lot more background, check out these prior posts about the case:

UPDATE:  This AP story provides a brief account of the argument in the Wilson case today, but it has no information about whether and when a ruling on the merits might be forthcoming.

MORE:  This updated AP piece indicates that the state judge "says he'll make a decision by Monday in the case of a Georgia man who was sentenced to 10 years in prison for having consensual oral sex with a 15-year-old when he was two years older than she was."

June 6, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

Wednesday, April 18, 2007

Will Genarlow Wilson get Duke justice?

The sad Genarlow Wilson case from Georgia (background here and here and here) is generating more press in the wake of the upstanding way in which North Carolina's Attorney General admitted mistakes in the Duke case.  Here is some of the latest coverage and commentary:

Some recent related posts:

April 18, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

Friday, April 13, 2007

Genarlow Wilson seeking state habeas relief

The sad Genarlow Wilson case from Georgia (background here and here) is back in the news because, as detailed in this news story, Wilson's lawyer, BJ Bernstein "filed a petition for writ of habeas corpus Thursday with the Superior Court of Monroe County."  In addition, as detailed on this website, advocates for Wilson are hoping to leverage the events in the Duke rape case to get justice for Wilson.  Here's what the website says:

Yesterday we saw the Attorney General of North Carolina step forward as the chief law enforcement officer to correct an injustice by a district attorney in the Duke rape case. Genarlow Wilson now appeals to the Attorney General of Georgia, Thurbert Baker to use his power to act justly, and review and consent to Wilson's habeas petition.  As the guardian of justice in this State, we appeal to him to correct this grave injustice.

Makes sense to me.

Some recent related posts:

April 13, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

Tuesday, April 03, 2007

More attention for Genarlow Wilson

I am pleased to see continued major media coverage of Genarlow Wilson's case (prior examples here and here).  Here are too more pieces complaining about the extreme sentence Wilson is serving for a consentual sexual encounter with another teenager:

April 3, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (1) | TrackBack

Thursday, March 29, 2007

A new website inspired by Genarlow Wilson

I have not blogged about the Genarlow Wilson case much lately because there has not been much to report.  Despite a flurry of media coverage calling for Wilson's release (details here and here), Georgia officials have not responded and Wilson is now deep into his third year in prison serving a 10-year sentence for a crime that Georgia law now classifies as a misdemeanor subject to only 12 months imprisonment.

Meanwhile, Wilson's case has inspired the creation of a new non-profit organizarion called "My 5th," which has this intriguing new website.  The website's home page states, "With this website, blog and workshops, MY 5th wants to prevent you from paying the price for not knowing the law!!!! Use the law, don't let it use you!!!".  An intriguing and diverse set of individuals are on My 5th's board, and Wilson's lawyer is listed as the president and founder of the organization.  Not suprisingly, Wilson's case is featured here on the My 5th site.

Some related Genarlow Wilson posts:

March 29, 2007 in Examples of "over-punishment" | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack