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September 27, 2009

A snippet of sex offender stories in the Sunday papers

As is the norm these days, the Sunday newspapers have no shortage of notable sex offender stories.  For example, the New York Times this morning brings us this piece, headlined "California Struggles With Paroled Sex Offenders."  Meanwhile, my own local paper, the Columbus Dispatch, had these two articles about sex offender regulations:

Additional stories covering similar themes include this local North Dakota piece, headlined "Registered sex offenders struggle to find housing" and this local Pennsylvania piece, headlined "General assembly works to close Megan's Law loopholes."

Of course, all of these significant and complex stories surrounding the challenges surrounding sex offender regulations will likely all be eclipsed by this new celebrity sex offender news: "Roman Polanski Arrested By Swiss On Underage-Sex Warrant From 1978." 

September 27, 2009 at 10:37 AM | Permalink

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Comments

It's almost time for the annual round of breathlessly hysterical media warnings, usually driven by local LEO press releases, about the mortal dangers from allowing registered sex offenders to give out candy or put up decorations at Halloween, scheduled to begin in 5, 4 3, 2, 1 ....

Posted by: Gritsforbreakfast | Sep 27, 2009 12:10:53 PM

New York Times this morning brings us this piece, headlined "California Struggles With Paroled Sex Offenders."

"Around the middle of his shift, Mr. Littleton received an alert that the police here in Escondido, a suburb of San Diego, were looking for a parolee supervised by his office named Ricardo Perez Borbon, 70, in connection with an assault on a 9-year-old girl. Mr. Borbon was on parole after serving 12 years for sexually assaulting a 9-year-old girl."

All they found of him was his tampered-with GPS device.

And yet, Google News does not find any other story about this. The Escondido police do not have listed as a most wanted on their web site. And Borbon is not listed in the Megan's Law database.

Could someone know the value of verisimilitude?

Posted by: George | Sep 27, 2009 12:16:08 PM

Eating crow. Borbon is listed. Maybe the Escondido press is waiting for the facts which is worthy of respect.

Posted by: George | Sep 27, 2009 2:23:05 PM

The extradition treaty with Switzerland allows to withhold a prisoner from the US, if it feels his rights would be violated. Given the politics between those two countries, this arrest may have been politically motivated to appease the US, on a rampage about tax shelters.

Posted by: Supremacy Claus | Sep 27, 2009 2:32:10 PM

I have had inquiries from friends about any laws limiting or preventing convicted sex offenders from using Facebook. One friend in New York has actually seen a man from her community, whom she knows to be a sex offender, on Facebook! After the offender's probation, parole and/or supervised release is completed, I am unaware of any law categorically prohibiting them from having Facebook accounts (although a Judge may so order in individual cases). Facebook doesn't check on the crimnal histories of its users. It seems like any laws or rules could be easily circumvented by the sex offender using a fictitious name and a fake profile picture. Doug and other readers, what do you think of this problem?

Posted by: Jim Gormley | Sep 27, 2009 10:50:04 PM

If Facebook starts to check and limit participation it may lose its immunity as an internet carrier. Now, without checking, the telephone company is not responsible for a bank robbery planned over its lines. If it starts to check, and misses misconduct, lawyers will pounce with ruinous litigation.

Thank the lawyer for the end of common sense and safety.

Posted by: Supremacy Claus | Sep 28, 2009 12:26:52 AM

Jim. I fail to understand why it's a problem. The unspoken assumption is that the SO is their to prey. Highly unlikely. 80% of sexual offenders are first time offenders. There a reason that Facebook and others don't check criminal history. It's pointless. It doesn't prevent anything.

Posted by: Daniel | Sep 28, 2009 1:01:04 AM

Thank the vile American lawyer, federal thug, for this pointless international incident with our best friends in Europe. The phony victim has stated, and years ago, she wants all charges dropped.

http://www.reuters.com/article/mediaNews/idUSLR8949520090927

This is a lawyer gotcha. It will generate massive lawyer fees and complex international procedures.

This is a crime with no victim, no harm. It cost the US economy $billions. He left Hollywood and did bs art films. He has not had a big hit since. He needed the discipline and culture of the Hollywood infrastructure. It needed him. Thank the lawyer for $billions lost to the US economy.

The craven Swiss are also a trip. They cave into the federal thugs on the tax shelter, and kiss cult criminal rear with this bogus gesture. The IRS are the collector for the criminal cult enterprise, in total failure in every goal of every law subject save for rent seeking, at which they are a wild success. At the point of a gun, they collect our money and we get nothing back. Beyond getting nothing back, due to unrelenting lawyer incompetence, we suffer losses, such as the revenues from the films of this false fugitive. Such incompetence has to be intentional, it is that extreme.

Posted by: Supremacy Claus | Sep 28, 2009 5:17:39 AM

Here we go, $million in fees coming right up in the Polanski arrest.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090928/ap_en_ce/eu_switzerland_polanski

Posted by: Supremacy Claus | Sep 28, 2009 2:56:16 PM

haha we see such trends in Asia as well

Posted by: Ho | Sep 28, 2009 4:00:12 PM

Professor, in Poland they OKd a law to castrate certain sex offenders:

http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSTRE58O4LE20090925

I think this is not a bad idea, though I'm sure you disagree.

Posted by: Myron Canfeldt | Sep 28, 2009 4:29:28 PM

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