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August 27, 2015

"Criminal Justice Reform Begins With Fair Sentencing and Fair Chances"

American-spectator_20070710The title of this post is the headline of this new commentary which strikes me as especially notable because (1) it is authored by the Coaltion for Public Safety's senior policy advisor, Lance Lemmonds, who recently worked for the Association of Prosecuting Attorneys and on a number of Republican campaigns, and (2) it is published by The American Spectator.  Here are excerpts:

Political conservatives who, since at least the Nixon administration, have worn with pride the badge of “tough on crime” are beginning to realize that tough doesn’t necessarily mean the same as being “smart on crime.”

Just as the private sector has embraced the mantra of “working smarter, not harder,” it’s time for federal and state officials to acknowledge the need for a smarter and more cost-effective criminal justice system.

Reducing life-without-parole sentences is one of several planks in the Coalition for Public Safety’s nonpartisan campaign for fair sentencing and fair chances, the overall goal of which is aimed at reducing the nation’s burgeoning jail and prison populations and breaking down the barriers to successful re-entry into society.

The coalition supporting the fair sentencing and fair chances campaign believes that we can dramatically reduce the enormous amount of money — currently $80 billion — that American taxpayers spend annually on incarceration in the state and federal jail and prison systems — and do so without jeopardizing public safety.  That coalition includes the conservative groups Americans for Tax Reform, Faith & Freedom Coalition and FreedomWorks.

In addition to calling for a reduction in the number of life-without-parole sentences, CPS’ fair sentencing and fair chances campaign is also calling for reducing the length of federal mandatory-minimum sentences for nonviolent offenses, so that the punishment fits the crime.  That will help safely alleviate prison overcrowding while also curbing burgeoning costs....

At both the federal and state levels, we also advocate greater use of alternatives to incarceration, where appropriate.  These include restitution, community supervision and residential re-entry centers, both pre-trial and post-sentencing, as well as expanded access to mental health care, substance-abuse treatment, education and job training.

Programs that allow inmates to reduce their sentences through credit for good behavior and participation in recidivism-reduction training should be expanded. So should the sealing of criminal records, where appropriate, to encourage rehabilitation and to make it easier for ex-offenders to find gainful employment and reintegrate into society....

Clearly, something needs to be done when, since 1980, the federal prison population has increased nearly tenfold and the state prison population has quadrupled.  More than 1 percent of all U.S. adults are now behind bars, by far the highest rate of any nation in the world.

By addressing much-needed reforms to the current one-size-fits-all approach to prison sentencing, and by also reducing barriers to education, housing, and employment that so many ex-offenders face, we can protect our communities and increase public safety.  We must seize this unique opportunity for progress to make the justice system smarter, fairer, and more effective.

August 27, 2015 at 11:02 AM | Permalink

Comments

I hate to bring this up but.....the single largest and easiest brick wall to have removed would be to have Chuck Grassley retire, immediately.

He is a good man and done lots of good for Iowa, no doubt. But he doesnt have a clue what hes doing with his crime bill with regards to the Federal mandatory minimums.

Thoughts anyone.

Posted by: MidWestGuy | Aug 27, 2015 9:55:45 PM

Let me just say this:
1. Children need both parents at some time in their life.
2. It takes two to make a chaild.
3. Many innocent men have been imprisoned by selfish women.
4. CPS does more harm than good.
5. The justice system makes a lot of revenue interfering in families.
6. Justice is about rehabilitation, not revenue.
7. Justice is about doing harm or damage to others and they make a claim (not the ambitious prosecutor).
8. Punishment never ends - from probation, lists, residence and ect. even if they have served ALL their time.

Posted by: LC in Texas | Aug 29, 2015 3:09:56 PM

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