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August 5, 2015

"Why Opposing Hyper-Incarceration Should Be Central to the Work of the Anti-Domestic Violence Movement"

The title of this post is the title of this notable new paper available via SSRN authored by Donna Coker and Ahjane Macquoid. Here is the abstract:

We demonstrate that among the many negative results of hyper-incarceration is the risk of increased domestic violence.  In Part I, we describe the growth of hyper-incarceration and its racial, class, and gender disparate character.  This growth in criminalization has been fueled by racist ideologies and is part of a larger neoliberal project that also includes disinvestment in communities, diminishment of the welfare state, and harsh criminalization of immigration policy. We place the dominant crime-centered approach to domestic violence in this larger neoliberal context.

The well-documented harms of hyper-incarceration -- collateral consequences that limit the economic and civic opportunities of those with criminal convictions; the emotional and economic harms to families of incarcerated parents; prison trauma and the deepening of destructive masculinities; the weakening of a community’s social structure, economic viability, and political clout -- produce harms that research demonstrates are tied to increased risks for the occurrence of domestic violence.

Anti-domestic violence advocates have responded to neoliberal anti-poor and anti-immigrant policies with two strategies: exceptionalizing domestic violence victims and expanding the reach of VAWA.  These strategies are likely to become less tenable in the current political climate.  We argue for a more inclusive political alignment of anti-domestic violence organizations with social justice organizations that addresses the larger structural inequalities that fuel violence.  A key part of that alignment is opposition to hyper-incarceration.

August 5, 2015 at 02:00 PM | Permalink

Comments

Was it not true that the police cut domestic abuse complaints by a half after the policy to arrest the abuser began, whether the victim wanted it or not?

Posted by: Supremacy Claus | Aug 5, 2015 8:34:02 PM

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