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September 30, 2015

Education Secretary calls on state and local governments to "put a new emphasis on schools rather than jails"

Secretary of Education Arne Duncan today gave this notable speech at the National Press Club.  The lengthy speech covers a lot of ground, but it is especially focused on the "linkage between education, or a lack thereof, and incarceration" and calls upon government to reorient funding to prioritized education over criminalization. Here are excerpts from the speech, which merits a read in full:

I want to lay out an idea today that will strike some as improbable or impractical, but which I think is essential.  It's about setting a different direction as a society, a different priority — one that says we believe in great teaching early in our kids' lives, rather than courts, jails and prisons later....

The bet we're making now is clear.  In the last three decades, state and local correctional spending in this country has increased almost twice as fast as spending on elementary and secondary education.  Ask yourself, "What does that say about what we believe?"

Leaders at the state and local levels have the power to change that — to place a bet on getting it right with kids from the start, and on the power of great teaching in particular.

I'm not pretending for a second that schools can do this alone — that they can replace efforts to deal with poverty, hunger, homelessness, or other ills that affect our young people.  But the facts about the impact of great teaching are too powerful to ignore....

The linkage between education, or a lack thereof, and incarceration is powerful.  More than two-thirds of state prison inmates are high school dropouts.  And an African-American male between the ages of 20 and 24 without a high school diploma or GED has a higher chance of being imprisoned than of being employed.

Today, our schools suspend roughly three and a half million kids a year, and refer a quarter of a million children to the police each year.  And the patterns are even more troubling for children of color — particularly boys — and for students with disabilities.

We cannot lay our incarceration crisis at the door of our schools.  But we have to do our part to end the school to prison pipeline.  That's going to force us to have difficult conversations about race, which I'll get to in a moment.

But I want to start by talking about bold new steps our states and cities can take to get great teachers in front of our neediest kids.  It's hardly a secret that it's challenging to recruit and keep fantastic teachers in the schools where the needs are greatest.  The rewards of that work are extraordinary — but it's an incredibly hard job.

So here's an idea for how you put a new emphasis on schools rather than jails.  If our states and localities took just half the people convicted of nonviolent crimes and found paths for them other than incarceration, they would save upwards of $15 billion a year.

If they reinvested that money into paying the teachers who are working in our highest-need schools and communities — they could provide a 50 percent average salary increase to every single one of them.  Specifically, if you focused on the 20 percent of schools with the highest poverty rates in each state, that would give you 17,640 schools — and the money would go far enough to increase salaries by at least 50 percent.

I've long said great teachers deserve to be paid far more.  With a move like this, we'd not just make a bet on education over incarceration, we'd signal the beginning of a long-range effort to pay our nation's teachers what they are worth.  That sort of investment wouldn't just make teachers and struggling communities feel more valued.  It would have ripple effects on our economy and our civic life. ...

There are lots of ways to go about this, and ultimately, local leaders and educators will know what's best for their community.  But the bottom line is that we must do more to ensure that more strong teachers go to our toughest schools.

Right now, in far too many places, glaring and unconscionable funding gaps create all the wrong incentives.  To take just one example — and there are many — the Ferguson-Florissant school district in Missouri spends about $9,000 per student. Eleven miles away, in Clayton, funding is about double, at $18,000 per student. How is that a plan to give kids a fair start?...

Let's invest more in the adults who have dedicated their professional careers to helping young people reach their full potential.  And let's place a new emphasis on our young people as contributors to a stronger society, not inmates to pay for and warehouse.

I'm not naïve about doing all of this overnight.  And for those already in the system, we can't just walk away from them — we also have to invest in education, career training, treatment, and support programs that help young people who are already involved in the criminal justice system become contributing members of our society.  That's why we are starting the Second Chance Pell program, to give those who are incarcerated a better chance at going to college.

To be totally clear, I'll repeat that we are talking about savings that come from alternative paths that involve only nonviolent offenders.  This is not about being soft on dangerous criminals — this is about finding ways, consistent with wise criminal justice policies, to reapportion our resources so we prevent crime in the first place....

 I'm convinced that making a historic bet on getting it right from the start would pay massive returns for our families, our communities, our society and our nation's economy. According to a 2009 McKinsey report, the achievement gap between us and other top-performing nations is depriving the U.S. economy of more than $2 trillion in economic output every year.

A separate study found that a 10 percent increase in high school graduation rates would reduce murder and assault arrest rates by approximately 20 percent.  And a one percent increase in male graduation rates would save up to $1.4 billion in the social costs of incarceration.  So you don't have to be a liberal romantic to like the idea of investing up front in our kids.  A hard-nosed look at the bottom line will take you to the same place.

I recognize that what I've just laid before you is ambitious.  But, if we're serious about eliminating the "school to prison pipeline," a shift in funding is only part of what we need to do. In truth, there's a lot more we need to get right....

Taking the essential steps to expand what we know works in education should be a no-brainer.  But there's more to it than just budgets and policies.  Perhaps the hardest step of all is taking an unsparing look at our own attitudes and decisions, and the ways they are tied to race and class. In the wake of Ferguson, Baltimore and elsewhere, this has become a central discussion for many in America, and rightly so — if belatedly.  Those of us in education cannot afford to sit back.

Let's recognize, up front, that this is among the hardest conversations we can have in education.  People enter this field out of love for students and the genuine desire to see them excel and thrive.  Yet we also know that suspension, expulsion and expectations for learning track too closely with race and class.

As the author Ta-Nehisi Coates recently pointed out, our high rates of incarceration, our high numbers of high school dropouts, and our high rates of child poverty are not unrelated problems....

It's difficult work, challenging centuries of institutionalized racism and class inequality. But I firmly believe a hard look at ourselves is an essential part of becoming the nation we strive to be — one of liberty and opportunity, regardless of the circumstances of your birth.

September 30, 2015 at 06:06 PM | Permalink

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