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November 15, 2018

"Eight Keys to Mercy: How to shorten excessive prison sentences"

The title of this post is the title of this notable new Prison Policy Initiative report.  I recommend the whole report, and here are excerpts from its start and its summary concepts:

After decades of explosive growth, prison populations have mostly flattened. Much of that is due to lawmakers lessening penalties for drug possession or low-level property offenses. While a welcome start, a bolder approach is necessary to truly begin to make a dent in the numbers of individuals who have served and will serve decades behind bars. This approach will take political courage from legislators, judges, and the executive branch of state governments.

Approximately 200,000 individuals are in state prisons serving natural life or “virtual” life sentences.  And as of year’s end 2015, one in every six individuals in a state prison had been there at least for 10 years. 

These are not merely statistics. These are people, sentenced to unimaginably long sentences in ways that do little to advance justice, provide deterrence, or offer solace to survivors of violence. The damage done to these individuals because of the time they must do in prison cells — as well as to their families and their communities — is incalculable.

People should not spend decades in prison without a meaningful chance of release.  There exist vastly underused strategies that policy makers can employ to halt, and meaningfully reverse, our overreliance on incarceration. We present eight of those strategies below....

Our 8 strategies

The eight suggested reforms in this report can shorten time served in different ways:

  • Several ways to make people eligible for release on parole sooner. 
  • One way to make it more likely that the parole board will approve conditional release on parole.
  • Several ways to shorten the time that must be served, regardless of sentencing and parole decisions.
  • One simple way to ensure that people are not returned to prison.

Of course, states vary in many ways, most critically in how they structure parole eligibility, and policymakers reading this report should anticipate tailoring our suggested reforms to their state systems. Each of the reforms laid out in this report could be effective independent of the others.  However, we encourage states to use as many of the following tools as possible to shorten excessive sentences:

  1. Presumptive parole
  2. Second-look sentencing
  3. Granting of good time
  4. Universal parole eligibility after 15 years
  5. Retroactive application of sentence reduction reforms
  6. Elimination of parole revocations for technical violations
  7. Compassionate release
  8. Commutation

November 15, 2018 at 04:31 PM | Permalink

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