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January 4, 2019

"Why Aren’t Democratic Governors Pardoning More Prisoners?"

The question in the title of this post is the headline of this notable new piece in The Atlantic by Matt Ford. The subtitle adds "It's one of the most effective tools for reducing mass incarceration, but few are taking advantage of it."  Here are excerpts:

Governors in most states have the power to pardon or commute sentences, either at their sole discretion or with some level of input from a commission. Since most convictions occur at the state level, some governors can wield even greater influence on criminal justice than the president can.  But most governors rarely use this power, and few have made it a mainstay of their tenure in office — a major missed opportunity for justice and the public good.

Some outgoing governors were particularly resistant. New Mexico Governor Susana Martinez, a former prosecutor, issued only three pardons during her two terms in office and added new restrictions to deter applicants.  Florida Governor Rick Scott turned the state’s clemency system into a hopeless slog.  Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker issued no pardons during his eight years in power, and in one of his final official acts, he signed a bill requiring state officials to keep a list of pardoned people who commit subsequent crimes and the governor who pardoned them.

All three of those governors hail from the Republican Party, which traditionally favored tough-on-crime policies. But even Democratic governors can be stingy.  New York Governor Andrew Cuomo made headlines last month when he pardoned 22 immigrants who faced deportation or couldn’t apply for citizenship because of previous state convictions.  The pardons gave Cuomo a chance to cast himself as a leading figure in the Democratic resistance to President Trump.  But with almost 200,000 New Yorkers in prison, probation, or parole, issuing fewer than two dozen pardons is hardly a courageous act....

What would it look like if governors pursued a more aggressive approach to their clemency powers?  Jerry Brown, California’s outgoing governor, carved out a model of sorts.  The state’s longtime leader spent his fourth and final term in office setting a national benchmark for clemency: The Times of San Diego reported that Brown has pardoned at least 1,332 inmates since 2011, quadrupling the number issued by the preceding four governors combined.  The burst of activity is particularly stark compared to his two immediate predecessors, Arnold Schwarzenegger and Gray Davis, who respectively issued fifteen and zero pardons....

So where could a more apprehensive governor begin? Perhaps the most prudent place would be the swelling numbers of elderly prisoners who were condemned to spend their dying years behind bars.  In a December 2017 report, the Vera Institute for Justice found that roughly 10 percent of prisoners in state custody in 2013 — roughly 131,000 people — were more than 55 years old. Demographic trends are expected to raise that figure to 30 percent by 2030.  Multiple states already have compassionate-release programs for elderly or dying prisoners; governors could fast-track pardon and commutations to accelerate the process.

January 4, 2019 at 11:33 PM | Permalink

Comments

They can't be bothered with peons. We are only slaves to the Public Employees.

Posted by: LC in Texas | Jan 5, 2019 11:18:07 AM

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