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February 27, 2019

"Failure should not be an option: Grading the parole systems of all 50 states"

The title of this post is the title of this new report from the Prison Policy Initiative.  Here is how this report gets started:

From arrest to sentencing, the process of sending someone to prison in America is full of rules and standards meant to guarantee fairness and predictability.  An incredible amount of attention is given to the process, and rightly so.  But in sharp contrast, the processes for releasing people from prison are relatively ignored by the public and by the law.  State paroling systems vary so much that it is almost impossible to compare them.

Sixteen states have abolished discretionary parole, and the remaining states range from a system of presumptive parole โ€” where when certain conditions are met, release on parole is guaranteed โ€” to having policies and practices that make earning release almost impossible.

Parole systems should give every incarcerated person ample opportunity to earn release and have a fair, transparent process for deciding whether to grant it.  A growing number of organizations and academics have called for states to adopt policies that would ensure consistency and fairness in how they identify who should receive parole, when those individuals should be reviewed and released, and what parole conditions should be attached to those individuals.  In this report, I take the best of those suggestions, assign them point values, and grade the parole systems of each state.

Sadly, most states show lots of room for improvement.  Only one state gets a B, five states get Cs, seven states get Ds, and the rest either get an F for having few of the elements of a fair and equitable parole system or a zero โ€” for having passed laws to eliminate the option of release on parole.

February 27, 2019 at 04:06 AM | Permalink

Comments

Texas needs to get its act together. A prisoner (innocent) refused parole and served full sentence because he did not want to say he was guilty to get a parole. So he gets out and he now has to report every month to a probation officer - go figure!

Posted by: LC in Texas | Feb 28, 2019 8:11:11 PM

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