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February 4, 2019

Prez Trump's special guests for his 2019 State of the Union Address suggest he will give significant attention to criminal justice reforms

This new White House release details a baker's dozen list of "the special guests who will join the President and First Lady at the U.S. Capitol when President Donald J. Trump delivers the second State of the Union Address of his presidency."  Here are two names on the list that should be familiar to regular readers of this blog:

Matthew Charles

Matthew Charles’s life is a story of redemption.  In 1996, he was sentenced to 35 years in prison for selling crack cocaine and other related offenses. While in prison, Matthew found God, completed more than 30 bible studies, became a law clerk, taught GED classes, and mentored fellow inmates.  On January 3, 2019, Matthew was the first prisoner released as a result of the First Step Act....

Alice Johnson

President Trump granted Alice Johnson clemency on June 6, 2018.  Alice had been serving a mandatory life sentence without parole for charges associated with a nonviolent drug case.  During her nearly 22 years of incarceration, Alice accomplished what has been called an “extraordinary rehabilitation.”  After her release, she was overjoyed to be reunited with her family.  She has now dedicated her life to helping those who are in a similar position as she was and giving a voice to the criminal justice reform movement.

I am so very pleased that Matthew Charles and Alice Johnson will have the opportunity to attend the State of the Union and in so doing will provide such a positive and importance face for criminal justice reform efforts.  I am also hoping (though not really expecting) that Prez Trump might talk about clemency activity (and reform to the clemency process) and further reform of mandatory-minimum sentences (including retroactive application of recent reforms) as potential next steps for his administration and as important agenda items for the new Congress.

Prior related post:

February 4, 2019 at 08:24 PM | Permalink

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