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March 22, 2019

Philly DA looking to curtail duration of probation and parole

Many years ago, I heard an academic a lot smarter than me say that the US would never make a serious dent in mass incarceration if and while we still had an even more massive number of persons subject to criminal justice supervision. He suggested that it was unavoidable that some percentage subject to community supervision would end up going back to prison, and so to reduce incarceration levels we had to also reduce supervision levels.

This story is salient this morning because of this notable new press report from Philadelphia headlined "Philly DA Larry Krasner: We took on mass incarceration. Now we’re addressing mass supervision." Here are the basics (with this from the original):

Over his first year in office, Philadelphia District Attorney Larry Krasner rolled out a series of internal policies described as “an effort to end mass incarceration": seeking shorter sentences, diverting low-level offenses from the justice system, and charging crimes at a lower level. 

Now, he’s looking to the next step. “One of our big priorities this year," he said, "is to try to address mass supervision — which, of course, would be both probation and parole.”

Philadelphia counted 42,000 people on county supervision at the end of 2017, or one in 22 adults. Statewide, Pennsylvanians are under correctional control at the second-highest rate in the nation, behind Georgia, and has the highest rate of parolees.

“I think people instinctively believed too much supervision is not enough. But it turns out too much supervision is too much. ... It does tremendous harm, and it costs a fortune,” Krasner said in an interview outlining policies to be announced Thursday. Nationally, about 40 percent of people on probation are reincarcerated, making community supervision a major driver of incarceration. About 40 percent of Philadelphia’s jail population is being held on a detainer for a violation of probation or parole.

His plan? To put his office’s weight behind a push to drastically curtail terms of supervision, which can stretch on for years or even decades, long after prison and jail sentences have been concluded.

Under the new policy, on top of any sentence of incarceration for a felony, assistant district attorneys will seek community supervision terms averaging 18 months, with a ceiling of three years. For misdemeanors, they’ll seek probation or parole terms around six months, not to exceed one year of combined community supervision.

March 22, 2019 at 09:03 AM | Permalink

Comments

Federal is the worst case for supervised release.

Your criminal history category is still in tact and major prong.

So if you do the same minor irritating factor that someone in Cat 1 does and your in cat 6, your going to get hammered. By being in cat 6, youve already done 5-10 times more prison time than the cat 1 dude.

Drug and especially alcohol abusers build up a lot if history points. Owis, assault if only verbal ut all counts the same, speeding (radio full throttle) on & on. Weve all seen these types in the papers.

But do they deserve a lifetime of prison? The feds do, cause it gets these worthless do nothing never held a job people re-elected...

Am I right?

Posted by: MidWestGuy | Mar 22, 2019 10:37:00 AM

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